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Explore the Library


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The VR Field Trip Library is open to future explorers! Take a trip around the world using multiple devices. Remember to click the yellow HistoryView VR button at the top for an immersive virtual reality experience.

HistoryView2

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MV Polar Prince


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CCGS Sir Humphrey Gilbert was a Canadian Coast Guard light icebreaker and now a privately owned Arctic icebreaker Polar Prince. The ship entered service with the Department of Transport Marine Service in 1959 and transferred to the newly created Canadian Coast Guard in 1962, active until 1986. The icebreaker was sold to private interests in Newfoundland and the ship sat idle after 2001 until resold in 2009 to GTX Technology Canada Limited and renamed Polar Prince. Rebuilt, the icebreaker is now plying the waters of the Arctic Ocean. In 2017, the vessel was temporarily rechristened Canada C3 and used for a high-profile voyage around Canada’s three maritime coasts as part of the nation’s 150th anniversary. In 2002, the icebreaker was sold to Puddister Trading Co. Ltd of St. John’s and renamed Polar Prince. In 2002, the vessel was acquired by Star Line Inc. In 2005, the vessel was laid up at Clarenville, Newfoundland, and Labrador and put up for sale by Star Line on eBay. The vessel was later sold to GX Technologies of Calgary, Alberta in 2009 and modernized. (Wikipedia)

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Living Computers: Museum + Labs (LCM+L)


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Living Computers: Museum + Labs (LCM+L) is a computer and technology museum located in the SoDo neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. LCM+L showcases vintage computers which provide interactive sessions, either through time-sharing operating systems or single-user interfaces. This gives users a chance to actually use the computers online or in person in the museum. An expansion adds direct touch experiences with contemporary technologies such as virtual reality, self-driving cars, the internet of things, and robotics. This puts today’s computer technology in the context of how it’s being used to tackle real-world issues. LCM+L also hosts a wide range of educational programs and events in their state-of-the-art classroom and lab spaces.

According to LCM+L’s website, their goal is “to breathe life back into our machines so the public can experience what it was like to see them, hear them, and interact with them. We make our systems accessible by allowing people to come and interact with them, and by making them available over the Internet.” (Wikipedia)

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Palace of Fine Arts


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The Palace of Fine Arts in the Marina District of San Francisco, California, is a monumental structure originally constructed for the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in order to exhibit works of art presented there. One of only a few surviving structures from the Exposition, it is still situated on its original site. It was rebuilt in 1965, and renovation of the lagoon, walkways, and a seismic retrofit were completed in early 2009.

In addition to hosting art exhibitions, it remains a popular attraction for tourists and locals and is a favorite location for weddings and wedding party photographs for couples throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and such an icon that a miniature replica of it was built in Disney’s California Adventure in Anaheim. (Wikipedia)

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Submarine Lembit


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EML Lembit is one of two Kalev-class mine-laying submarines built for the Republic of Estonia before World War II and is now a museum ship in Tallinn. She was launched in 1936 at Vickers and Armstrongs Ltd., Barrow-in-Furness in England, and served in the Estonian Navy and the Soviet Navy. Until she was hauled out on 21 May 2011, Lembit was the oldest submarine still afloat in the world.[citation needed] Her sister ship, Kalev, was sunk in October 1941.
Lembit is the only surviving warship of the pre-war Estonian Navy and in the Baltic countries. Estonia is a maritime nation, and like every country with a long coastline to defend, it has to safeguard its territorial waters. With regard to experience gained and observed during World War I, submarines found their proper application in the pre–World War II Estonian Navy. The collection organized by the Submarine Fleet Foundation in May 1933 developed into one of the most successful undertakings among similar fundraising events nationwide.

In the course of building and testing the two submarines, the Estonian crews received training in Great Britain between 1935-1937. Throughout 1937–1940, Lembit and her sister ship Kalev were the most imposing vessels in the Estonian Navy. Their inactivity in the annexation of Estonia by the USSR was a political decision. (Wikipedia)