Mark Twain House

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The Mark Twain House and Museum in Hartford, Connecticut, was the home of Samuel Langhorne Clemens and his family from 1874 to 1891. It was designed by Edward Tuckerman Potter and built in the American High Gothic style. (Wikipedia)

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Troy Public Library

Citizens of Troy became interested in establishing a public library long before many cities of comparable size. Discussion concerning such a library actually began with a letter from an anonymous ‘Citizen of Troy’ in the November 13, 1799 Troy Northern Budget appealing for the establishment of a public library in order to “work out the salvation of, consummate the happiness of, and conduct to every door a correction of morals and a source of mental improvement” for the people of Troy. A collection of books became available for circulation, and a group of stockholders was formed in 1800. The library’s search for a permanent home spans 96 years.

For many years the library moved to and from offices and homes of those who had been designated librarian. In 1820, Library stairs leading to reading areawhen it was housed above the River Street Drug Store of that year’s librarian, Ira Wells, 190 of its 687 volumes were destroyed by fire. By 1835, soon after the incorporation of the Troy Young Men’s Association, the library and that organization joined forces in an effort to seek a more permanent location for a public library. In 1845, the Troy Library voted to disband and turn its property over to the Troy Young Men’s Association. In 1846, the collection was moved to its first somewhat more permanent home in the Athenaeum Building, which the Young Men’s Association rented from the Troy Savings Bank. Two other important events in the library’s history took place during this period. In 1859, the first complete catalog of the Troy Young Men’s Association was produced, listing 12,067 volumes. Several copies of this catalog still exist. In 1869, the library became a Federal Government Depository Library, a status it still maintains.

In 1877 another group, the Free Reading Room of Troy, was incorporated with the goal of providing library service to the citizens of Troy. Operating since 1874, it began at the Holly Tree Inn with the cooperation of its owner, but later moved to the basement of City Hall, then to a room in the Post Office. Trustees of the Free Reading Room wished to merge their small collection with that of the Young Men’s Association and to make the entire stock available to Troy citizens at no charge. In 1879, the Young Men’s Association and the Free Reading Room came together and agreed on what they called “The Public Library Enterprise.” The Young Men’s Association later purchased the Athenaeum Building, and in 1885 Troy had its first permanently housed public library. (Troy Public Library)

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Charles Dickens Museum

The Charles Dickens Museum is an author’s house museum at 48 Doughty Street in Holborn, London Borough of Camden. It occupies a typical Georgian terraced house which was Charles Dickens’s home from 25 March 1837 to December 1839. (Wikipedia)

Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. (Wikipedia)

 

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Temple of Literature

The Temple of Literature (VietnameseVăn Miếu, Hán-Nôm: 文廟) is a Temple of Confucius in Hanoi, northern Vietnam. The temple hosts the Imperial Academy (Quốc Tử Giám, 國子監), Vietnam’s first national university. The temple was built in 1070 at the time of Emperor Lý Thánh Tông. (Wikipedia)

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Helen Keller’s Birthplace

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Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deaf-blind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree. The story of how Keller’s teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Her birthplace in West Tuscumbia, Alabama, is now a museum and sponsors an annual “Helen Keller Day”. Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, the 100th anniversary of her birth.

A prolific author, Keller was well-traveled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women’s suffrage, labor rights, socialism, anti-militarism, and other similar causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame in 1971 and was one of twelve inaugural inductees to the Alabama Writers Hall of Fame on June 8, 2015. Keller proved to the world that deaf people could all learn to communicate and that they could survive in the hearing world. She also taught that deaf people are capable of doing things that hearing people can do. One of the most famous deaf people in history, she is an idol to many deaf people in the world. (Wikipedia)