Colonial National Historical Park: Yorktown Battlefield – Redoubt 9

Colonial National Historical Park is located in the Hampton Roads region of Virginia and is operated by the National Park Service of the United States government. The park protects and interprets several sites relating to the Colony of Virginia and the history of the United States more broadly, ranging from the site of the first landing of the English settlers who would settle at Jamestown, to the battlefields of Yorktown where the British Army was finally defeated in the American Revolutionary War. Over 3 million people visit the park each year.(Wikipedia)

American Revolution

In the late 1760s, the American colonies were in a state of unrest. The colonists had been living under British rule for over a decade, and they were growing tired of it. They began to demand more autonomy, and when the British government refused to give it to them, they took up arms and revolted.

The American Revolution was a long and bloody conflict that lasted for over eight years. In the end, the colonists emerged victorious, and in 1783 they signed the Treaty of Paris, which recognized their independence.

The American Revolution was a watershed moment in world history. It proved that people could successfully overthrow an oppressive government, and it inspired other oppressed people to fight for their own freedoms. The principles of liberty and democracy that the American Revolution helped to establish are still relevant today, and the country that it created is now one of the most powerful in the world.

Cornwall Regimental Museum

Captured By: Ocean3DUK

The Cornwall Regimental Museum is a local military history is depicted through 12,000 artifacts including weapons & battlefield letters.

Bodmin Keep is over 160 years old and is the historic home of the Army in Cornwall.  This former headquarters of the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry houses the museum, with more than three hundred years of military history, a library and meeting rooms. Each of the 12,000 collection items has its own story to tell. Stories about the battles that have been fought, weapons that were used or personal letters that were written on the battlefield.

Penlee Lifeboat

RNLB ON-1265 Ivan Ellen – Severn Class

The Severn has a sheerline that sweeps down for ease of survivor recovery. The Penlee Lifeboat is inherently self-righting and should it be knocked over in extreme weather, it will automatically right itself within a few seconds. Her propellers and rudders lie in partial tunnels set into the hull that, along with the two bilge keels, provide excellent protection from damage in shallow water. In addition to her twin engines, the Severn is fitted with a hydraulic-powered bow thruster for improved maneuverability. The comprehensive electronics include VHF and MF radios with DSC functionality, VHF direction finder, DGPS with electronic chart system and radar. The Severn carries a small Y boat, which is an inflatable daughter boat complete with a 15hp outboard engine. This small craft can be launched with a crane and is used in moderate conditions to access areas where the lifeboat cannot reach. Comprehensive first aid equipment includes stretchers, oxygen, and Entonox. Other equipment includes a portable salvage pump carried in a watertight container. The last Severn class lifeboat was built in 2004. The lifeboats undergo a regular condition-based maintenance regime to check their condition.

Date introduced:  1995

On station:  March 2003

ON: 1265

Launch type:  Afloat

Number in fleet:  35 at stations plus 9 in the relief fleet

Last built: 2004

Crew: Nominal 7

Length:  17.3m

Beam/width:  5.9m

Draught/depth:  1.78m

Displacement: 42 tonnes

Max speed:  25 knots

Fuel capacity:  5,600 litres

Operating range/endurance:  250 nautical miles

Construction:
Hull:
 fiber-reinforced composite with single-skin section below the chine and 100mm thick foam-cored sandwich
Above deck and superstructure: 25mm foam-cored sandwich

Engines:  2 x Caterpillar 3412 TA marine diesel; 1,250hp each at 2,300rpm

Survivor capacity:  Self-righting – 28 – Non-self-righting – 124

Funded by: Mr Harold Ivan Leach

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

HMS Belfast | Imperial War Museums

The HMS Belfast was originally a light cruiser vessel built for the United Kingdom’s Royal Navy. Commissioned in 1939 shortly before World War II, the HMS Belfast was used in the Royal Navy’s war efforts including a naval blockade against Germany, escort missions for the Soviet Union, and the Battle of North Cape. During World War II, the HMS Belfast also supported the Normandy landings. Today, the ship permanently sits along the River Thames in London, UK as a museum. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Lime Venue Portfolio

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Churchill War Rooms

The Churchill War Rooms in London is a museum located inside the British government’s former underground command center during World War II. The museum is dedicated to the life and legacy of Winston Churchill who served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. Churchill’s speeches and radio broadcasts during the war are considered to be some of the most influential and inspirational speeches of any world leader ever known. (Matterport)

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Wampanoag Homesite Wetu

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Pilgrim Villager House

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)