Climbing 1 World Trade Center: Man on Spire

Climb to the top of 1 World Trade Center with the professional mountaineer and photographer Jimmy Chin.

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1TYmhew

Subscribe to the Times Video newsletter for free and get a handpicked selection of the best videos from The New York Times every week: http://bit.ly/timesvideonewsletter

Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

What’s inside the Washington Monument?

After being closed for 3 years, we show you never before view of the greatest tourist attraction in DC! Whether watching on your phone or in VR180, you can see this national treasure in an incredible way. Make sure to turn up the quality of your viewing experience to 5k, if you have a headset use that for VR viewing, or move your finger around on the screen to see all angles of this incredible monument to America’s First President. Huge thanks to the US Department of the Interior for giving us this incredible access before it reopens on September 19th 2019.

The Washington Monument is an obelisk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate George Washington, once commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, in the American Revolutionary War and the first President of the United States. (Wikipedia)

Height555′
EstablishedJanuary 31, 1848
OpenedOctober 9, 1888
Floors3

Chateau Bellevue – Austin Woman’s Club

Captured By: virtualATX
Chateau Bellevue is home of the Austin Woman’s Club. The members of the Austin Woman’s Club have cared for and preserved this historic building since 1929. Originally built as a private home, the building is now an events venue in downtown Austin, Texas.

 

Tiny Home That Runs on Dunkin

Written by: Drew MacFarlane, Weather.com

At a Glance

  • Dunkin’ Donuts has constructed a tiny home than runs entirely on a biofuel created using recycled coffee grounds.

  • The Home that Runs on Dunkin’ is a custom, fully-functional and transportable 275-square-foot tiny home.

  • The home includes a master bedroom, full-sized bathroom, kitchen, coffee nook and cedar porch.

Dunkin’ Donuts unveiled their multi-million dollar advertising tagline “America Runs on Dunkin'” more than 12 years ago, and now, that tagline can be applied to a house.

Cue the Home that Runs on Dunkin’, a custom, fully functional and transportable tiny house built to run entirely on a biofuel created out of recycled coffee grounds, the company announced in a press release.

By partnering with Blue Marble Biomaterials, a sustainable biochemical company, the companies were able to create the eco-friendly biofuel out of nearly 65,000 pounds of spent Dunkin’ Donuts coffee grounds.

The biofuel blend that powers the tiny home is made up of 80 percent coffee oil extracted from recycled grounds and 20 percent alcohol. For every 170 pounds of used coffee grounds, about one gallon of fuel is produced for use in a standard biofuel generator.

The tiny home itself was built in a partnership with New Frontier Tiny Homes, which constructed the home in just over three months. The 275-square-foot tiny home comes complete with a king-size bed, a full-size bathroom with a spa tub and washer/dryer, a two-person living room, kitchen, coffee nook and full cedar porch that drops down from a garage door along the side of the house.

Even the home’s exterior was designed to be aesthetically remnant of coffee, using dark stained cedar wood and Corten steel panels that have a similar, rusty texture to that of coffee grounds.

Pasadena Museum of History: Ernest Batchelder Exhibit

Captured by: Craig Sauer 3D

The Pasadena Museum of History is featuring an exhibit, extended by popular demand through March 12, called “Batchelder: Tilemaker.”

Ernest A. Batchelder (1875-1957) was an Arts and Crafts tilemaker who lived in Pasadena’s Lower Arroyo Seco and made fountains, fireplaces and fixtures that can still be spotted in craftsman-style bungalows and at various sites throughout the Southern California area and beyond.

The exhibit celebrates the recent donation to the museum by Robert Winter, Ph.D., of a collection of Batchelder tile and archives. Since 1972, Winter has owned and lived in the house on what is now South Arroyo Boulevard where Batchelder built his first kiln, and where he lived during the years his design and tile business thrived.

Winter, a premier Batchelder expert, curated the exhibit, authored the accompanying book and figures prominently in the 15-minute documentary film that orients museum visitors to Batchelder’s life, importance and work.

Born and raised in the Nashua, New Hampshire area, Batchelder moved to Pasadena in 1901and became director of art at Throop Polytechnic Institute (the forerunner to what is today the California Institute of Technology).

But his spirit was restless, and through his travels to the Cotwolds town of Chipping-Camden, and his association with the Boston Society of Arts and Crafts and the Handicraft Guild in Minneapolis, he formed the resolve to give up his secure teaching position.

A hundred years ago, lovers of wood, clay and paint were chafing against the homogenized cheapness of factory-produced goods. Batchelder’s interest in the Arts and Crafts movement was inspired by the ideals of medievalism, with their guilds, mythical animals and tales of knighthood and chivalry. “The dignity of labor is of the mind and heart,” he observed, “not of the hand alone.”

In the early 1900s, Pasadena’s Arroyo — the area along the ravine that runs down from the San Gabriel Mountains through the western part of the city and south through town — was a thriving center for the movement.

Batchelder bought a piece of land there, envisioning a “productive workshop and school” in which “works would be executed in copper and silver, jewelry, enameling, leather and pottery.” In September 1909, he secured a permit to build a six-room, $2,600 frame bungalow. Noted Winter, “Batchelder’s design for his house used the dark-shingled, Swiss-chalet style we now call ‘craftsman’ to harmonize with its sylvan setting.”

In November 1910, Batchelder built a $300 shed in the backyard where he installed a single kiln. His tile-making business had begun.

At the beginning, he considered making even 12 six-inch tiles at a single process to be “quantity production.” By around 1912, however, the tiles — Byzantine birds, Viking ships, California missions — had become popular enough that the business moved to larger quarters to a site on Pasadena’s Broadway (now Arroyo Parkway).

As Winter observed, “Batchelder’s heart was in design — not in theory.”

“If you can appreciate and catch something of the grace and beauty of line in a simple wayside weed,” Batchelder wrote, “nature will yield you more in the way of suggestions for further work than if you sit down to the joyless task of torturing some gorgeous hothouse flower into conventional lines.”

In 1912, he married pianist Alice Coleman, whose legacy also lives on: the Coleman Chamber Music Association series that she started in 1904 continues to this day at Caltech. The Batchelders installed a keyboard in their beautifully tiled porch, where Alice performed her finger-strengthening exercises.

For those of us who thrill to rustic cedar shakes, dark unpainted wood beams, sleeping porches and the dreamy shade of live oaks, Batchelder’s tiles seem so beautifully evocative that you could almost eat them. Their muted, matte-finished colors — azure-dusted mauve, sea-green blue — were compared to those of a Persian rug “which do not admit of positively unharmonious combinations.”

The Batchelder-Wilson Company, as it came to be known, made fireplaces, fountains, bathrooms and fixtures that were affordable to those of modest means: “A fireplace is not a luxury; it is a necessity — because it adds to the joy and beauty of living,” Batchelder wrote.

One of its biggest assignments was the now long-gone Dutch Chocolate Shop in downtown Los Angeles, “a kind of German bierstube,” wrote Winter, “with arches and vaults, covered with tiles.” You can still admire his handiwork in the lobby of the historical landmark Fine Arts Building (1925) on West Seventh Street in downtown L.A., another of his finest installations.

The 1920s were its heyday. The Depression, sadly, effectively wiped the company out.

Walking the Lower Arroyo in the shade of today’s olive and sycamore trees, however, snowmelt murmuring down the flood channel after our recent rains, it’s easy to let the imagination wander back 100 years.

Up above, the lovingly tended home where Batchelder once lived shelters its own memories. Set into the metalwork of the redwood front door is a tile from one of his mentors, Henry Mercer, bearing the inscription, “Fluminis impetus letificat civitatem dei.”

The quote is from Psalm 46 and translates to: “There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the City of God.” (Courtesy of angelusnews.com)

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Project Sky 12 Dome House

Captured by: ivision3D

The home of the future is here! SkyDome’s homes are made from natural materials like pine wood, cork, flax, and seaweed, making them twice as strong and twice as efficient! The home’s unique dome shape means the structure needs no internal load-bearing walls, so the layout is fully customizable and features a massive internal space.

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Great Western Staircase

The Great Western Staircase is one of the highlights of the New York State Capitol Building in Albany. Also known as the “Million Dollar Staircase”, it took fourteen years to complete at a cost of almost 1.5 million dollars. In 1894, The New York Times called the staircase “the greatest architectural work on this continent.” While that may be a bit of an overstatement, the staircase really is amazing.

Henry Hobson Richardson was the original designer, but architect Isaac G. Perry directed its construction and added a significant amount of ornamental carvings. Over 500 stone carvers worked on the project under foreman Louis Hinton.

The staircase is enormous: 119 feet in height and containing 444 steps. The predominant materials are Corsehill freestone, medina sandstone, limestone, and granite. It is illuminated throughout by light fixtures designed by Louis Hinton, and an enormous skylight on the top floor bathes the uppermost levels in natural light.

Portrait busts of great historical figures in the history of New York and the nation adorn the stonework in great profusion along with the faces of the stone carvers’ families and friends, and random people from the street. Also present are scenes from American history, various animals, and other symbols. Famous figures portrayed include:

  • Susan B. Anthony
  • Christopher Columbus
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Alexander Hamilton
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Ulysses S. Grant
  • George Washington
  • Walt Whitman

The sculpture adds a level of detail that makes exploring the staircase a little more quaint and intriguing. The staircase would probably stand as a marvel without it, but it is a nice touch. The stonework itself is massive, but the configuration of the stairways and columns is such that at times space appears almost ethereal. The numerous arches, elliptical arches, columns, and groins create a dizzying space that easily impresses.

A $2.8 million dollar restoration of the entire staircase was completed in September of 2006. A hundred years of dirt, soot, and grime have been removed from the stone and light fixtures, revealing the original beauty of the materials.

Location
Washington Ave and State Street
Albany, NY 12247

Captured by: MCWB Architects

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Mid-Century Modern Architecture Museum

In November 2015 the Belleville Historical Society purchased the Terry and Thelma Blazier House at 8501 West Main Street (#6 Oak Knoll Place) in Belleville to serve as a Midcentury Modern Architecture Museum. Belleville architect Charles E. King designed the home for the Blaziers in 1952.

In 1962 the house was converted into a funeral home, and it served that role for over 50 years. It was home to a small church when the historical society purchased it.

Several modifications had been made to the original structure, and we are now renovating the home to restore many features to their original state. Our goal is to create a house that is symbolic of Midcentury Modern (MCM) architecture featuring the work of Charles E. King. (Mid-Century Modern Architecture Museum)

Captured by: InvelopNow

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Zhizhu Temple

The Songzhu Temple ( Tib. Zong dgon kru’u ;. Chin Songzhu si嵩祝寺) was a temple of Tibetan Buddhism , the Qing Emperor Yongzheng 1733 for the third [1] Cangkya Qutuqtu (changkya khutukhtu) had built , It is located at the address Songzhu Beixiang in Beijing District Dongcheng . On the temple grounds there is now a luxury hotel. [2]

Songzhu Temple and Zhizhu Temple [3] are since 1984 on the list of monuments of the city Beijing (3-30). (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Tosolini Productions

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Phaltan Palace

Take a trip to Mudhoji Manmohan Rajwada, an old palace in the city of Phaltan in Maharashtra, India. The palace was once the maternal home of Sambhaji Maharaj, son of the founder of the Maratha Empire, who succeeded the realm after his father’s death. The compound consists of residential buildings, several temples, spacious courtyards, and long halls. The interior reflects the architectural style of the period, from the intricate hand-carved woodwork seen in the columns and arches to the rich color palette in the paintings and tapestries. All of the rooms in the palace open out onto a central courtyard, or chowk, demonstrating a key feature in Indian architecture, allowing cool air to flow throughout the various rooms. The opulence of this royal home along with its architectural wonder makes it a very sought after attraction for tourists visiting the town of Phaltan. (Matterport)

Captured by: Housing.com

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Küçüksu Palace

The Küçüksu Palace was commissioned by Sultan Abd-ul-Mejid I (1823–1861) and designed by the architects Garabet Amira Balyan and his son Nigoğayos Balyan in the neo-baroque style. Completed in 1857, the structure took the place of a two-story timber palace built during the reign of Mahmud I (1696–1754) by his Grand Vizier Divittar Mehmed Pasha, then successively used by Selim III (1761–1808) and Mahmud II (1785–1839).

The building consists of two main stories and a basement on a footprint of 15 x 27 m. Unlike other palace gardens with high walls; its garden is surrounded by cast-iron railings with one gate at each of the four sides. The basement was appointed with kitchen, larder, and servant’s quarters, with the floors above reflecting the design of a traditional Turkish house – four corner rooms surrounding a central hall. The rooms at the waterfront have two fireplaces while the others have one each, all fashioned from colorful Italian marble. The rooms boast crystal chandeliers from Bohemia, with curtains, furniture upholstery, and carpets woven in Hereke. The halls and the rooms exhibit paintings and art objects; Sechan, stage designer at Vienna State Opera, was charged for the decoration of the interior.

During the reign of Sultan Abd-ul-Aziz (1830–1876), more elaborate decoration was added to the façade; some of the original garden outbuildings were demolished at that time. At the beginning of the Republican era, the site was used as a state guesthouse for some years. Since a thorough restoration in 1944, the palace has been open to the public as a museum.

The palace appeared in the James Bond film “The World Is Not Enough” as the mansion of a woman in Baku. The palace also appeared in popular Bollywood film Ek Tha Tiger. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Metaroma

Library

Learn More About HistoryView VR

Wampanoag Homesite Wetu

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Pilgrim Villager House

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Castle Van Male

Captured by: VR Media

Male Castle (DutchKasteel van Male) is a former castle in Male, once a separate village, now part of Sint-Kruis, a suburb of BrugesWest FlandersBelgium. The buildings, almost entirely rebuilt and restored after the destruction of World War II, have housed St. Trudo’s Abbey (Sint-Trudoabdij) since 1954.

The castle’s origins date back to the 9th century, as a defensive tower for protection of the territory around Bruges against the Vikings. Male was held by Philip of Alsace, Count of Flanders, between 1168 and 1191, who replaced the wooden structure with one built of stone, which included a chapel consecrated by the exiled archbishop of CanterburyThomas Becket, in 1166.

The castle was a residence of the Counts of Flanders (in 1329 it was the birthplace of Count Louis II, sometimes known as Louis of Male) but was also a stronghold in a much-disputed terrain. French forces occupied it. The city of Bruges retook it from its French garrison in the uprising of 1302. Soldiers from Ghent razed it in 1382 and after it had been rebuilt, ransacked it again in 1453. In 1473 it was burnt out and once again rebuilt: the present keep dates from that rebuilding and stands with its foundations directly in the moat, now flanked by symmetrical wings. The castle was plundered yet again in 1490 by the forces of the Count of Nassau.

When Flanders became a part of the Burgundian Netherlands Male retained its importance. During the Spanish occupation of the Low Countries, the citadel was sold in 1558 by Philip II to Juan Lopez Gallo.

It was occupied by German troops in both world wars and was severely damaged.

This mighty castle is now the property of the family Deprez. (Wikipedia)

Palace of Fine Arts

Captured by: Capture It 3D

The Palace of Fine Arts in the Marina District of San Francisco, California, is a monumental structure originally constructed for the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in order to exhibit works of art presented there. One of only a few surviving structures from the Exposition, it is still situated on its original site. It was rebuilt in 1965, and renovation of the lagoon, walkways, and a seismic retrofit were completed in early 2009.

In addition to hosting art exhibitions, it remains a popular attraction for tourists and locals and is a favorite location for weddings and wedding party photographs for couples throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and such an icon that a miniature replica of it was built in Disney’s California Adventure in Anaheim. (Wikipedia)