North Pole City

North Pole City (NPC) is a yearround family entertainment center located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The facility includes an indoor ice rink, a sledding hill, a Christmasthemed village, and a variety of other holidaythemed attractions. NPC is open to the public for individual visits, group rentals, and private events.

“Prix de West” 2021 National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

The2021 Prix de West at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is the museum‘s annual invitational art exhibition and sale featuring some of the nation‘s finest traditional and contemporary western art. The exhibition includes works of art from a variety of media, including oil, watercolor, wood, bronze, and metal sculptures. Prizes are awarded in several categories, including Western Art, Contemporary Art, TwoDimensional Works, ThreeDimensional Works, and Best of Show. The museum also offers educational lectures, seminars, demonstrations, and workshops on topics related to western art and culture. The2021 Prix de West embraces western culture and celebrates the talents of western artists by providing a platform for them to showcase their work for the world to appreciate.

Colonial National Historical Park: Yorktown Battlefield – Redoubt 9

Colonial National Historical Park is located in the Hampton Roads region of Virginia and is operated by the National Park Service of the United States government. The park protects and interprets several sites relating to the Colony of Virginia and the history of the United States more broadly, ranging from the site of the first landing of the English settlers who would settle at Jamestown, to the battlefields of Yorktown where the British Army was finally defeated in the American Revolutionary War. Over 3 million people visit the park each year.(Wikipedia)

Chaco Culture National Historical Park

Chaco Culture National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park in the American Southwest hosting a concentration of pueblos. The park is located in northwestern New Mexico, between Albuquerque and Farmington, in a remote canyon cut by the Chaco Wash. (Wikipedia)

Pecos National Historical Park

Ruins of the lost church, also known as the Ortiz Church, you will explore the fascinating history of some of the earliest missionary efforts in Northern New Mexico. The church, which dates from 1617-1621, was first described and mapped by Adolph Bandelier in 1880.

Pecos National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park in San Miguel and Santa Fe Counties, New Mexico. The park, operated by the National Park Service, encompasses thousands of acres of landscape infused with historical elements from prehistoric archaeological ruins to 19th-century ranches, to a battlefield of the American Civil War. (Wikipedia)

American Revolution

In the late 1760s, the American colonies were in a state of unrest. The colonists had been living under British rule for over a decade, and they were growing tired of it. They began to demand more autonomy, and when the British government refused to give it to them, they took up arms and revolted.

The American Revolution was a long and bloody conflict that lasted for over eight years. In the end, the colonists emerged victorious, and in 1783 they signed the Treaty of Paris, which recognized their independence.

The American Revolution was a watershed moment in world history. It proved that people could successfully overthrow an oppressive government, and it inspired other oppressed people to fight for their own freedoms. The principles of liberty and democracy that the American Revolution helped to establish are still relevant today, and the country that it created is now one of the most powerful in the world.

Auriesville Shrine

The Shrine of Our Lady of Martyrs is located in the hamlet of Auriesville in Fultonville, NY. Once the 17th Century Mohawk Village of Ossernenon, it is now a Roman Catholic shrine dedicated to three Jesuit missionaries who were martyred here, and to St. Kateri Tekakwitha, a Mohawk/Algonquin woman who was born here. (ourladyofmartyrsshrine.org)

America’s Stonehenge

America’s Stonehenge is an archaeological site consisting of a number of large rocks and stone structures scattered around roughly 30 acres within the town of Salem, New Hampshire in the United States. It is open to the public for a fee as part of a recreational area which includes snowshoe trails and an alpaca farm. (Wikipedia)
Address105 Haverhill Rd, Salem, NH 03079

Alexander Hamilton’s Grave

Captured by: Real Virtual Zone

Alexander Hamilton was one of the founding fathers of the United States and was also the first Secretary of the Treasury under George Washington’s administration. Vice President Aaron Burr and Hamilton challenged each other to a pistol duel which was the culmination of the pair’s long and bitter animosity for one another. Hamilton was mortally wounded by Burr and died the following day on July 12, 1804. Hamilton was buried in the Trinity Churchyard Cemetery in Manhattan, New York where his grave still stands today.

Allandale Mansion

Allandale is host to a rich history that intersects at key points in Kingsport history throughout the last century. But a lot can happen in that time, so we’ve broken it up into digestible points of interest for you. Explore this list of helpful links at your leisure and learn how Allandale came to be a key East Tennessee landmark.

Timashenko, landscape architect to President Dwight Eisenhower, designed and managed the details for the original Allandale grounds. Mr. Wassum [of Marion, Virginia], who also landscaped portions of the White House, was hired to arrange and plant the boxwoods and formal gardens. Allandale Mansion was planned around existing trees [which were by then centuries old], and additional large trees were imported by flat-bed truck and planted throughout the property.

Two large ponds were dug primarily to provide fire protection for the house, but also to beautify the grounds. Original plans also called for a substantial swimming pool complete with Grecian columns and statues.

In recent years, additional bedding plants [as well as dogwoods, magnolias, crepe myrtles, azaleas, boxwoods, and rhododendron] have been added to the back garden, and the Elise Brice Bourne formal rose garden was planted by her husband and friends to commemorate Mrs. Bourne’s dedicated service to the Friends of Allandale.

Most recently, Dr. Harry Coover and his family donated the “Heron Dome” in memory of his deceased wife, Mrs. Muriel Zumbach Coover. The “Dome” features a bronze heron sculpture in a shallow pool, surrounded by benches, landscaping, and lighting to make the structure suitable for evening events [such as weddings, parties, and social gatherings – or simply a quiet spot for reflection and enjoyment of nature’s beauty]. (Allandale) Captured by: TriReality

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Bent County/Las Animas Cemetery

For more than 160 years, the current Bent County/Las Animas Cemetery has served as a community burial ground and the final resting place for several famous names in Colorado history.

One famous Coloradan who rests there is fur trader William Bent, who with his brother built and operated the famous Bent’s Fort. A replica of the 1840s adobe fort is now a National Historic Site.

The cemetery is also the burial site of Amache Prowers, an influential Cheyenne woman who married one of the men in the Prowers family. The Prowers were early Coloradans who settled near Boggsville, adjacent to the area that is now the cemetery. (Susan M. Thornton)

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Lemp Mansion

The Lemp Mansion (3322 DeMenil Place, St. Louis, Missouri) is a historical house in Benton ParkSt. Louis, Missouri. It is also the site of four suicides by Lemp family members after the death of the son Frederick Lemp, whose William J. Lemp Brewing Co. dominated the St. Louis beer market before Prohibition with its Falstaff beer brand. The mansion is said to be haunted by members of the Lemp family. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: InvelopNow

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ClubCorp Holdings – Metropolitan Club

ClubCorp (NASDAQ: MYCC) is an American corporation with a home office in Dallas and is the largest owner and operator of private golf and country clubs in the country. It owns or operates more than 200 golf and country clubs and business, sports and alumni clubs worldwide.


Located in 26 states, the District of Columbia and two foreign countries, the company and the clubs in its network services more than 430,000 members and employ approximately 20,000 peak-season employees.

The Willis Tower, built as and still commonly referred to as the Sears Tower, is a 110-story, 1,450-foot skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Wikipedia Captured by: 360° 3D World

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Lawshe Memorial Museum

Lawshe Memorial Museum was created to protect, understand and share the history of the community, the Dakota County Historical Society was created in 1939.  They did not have a museum until 1955, and even then it was small, housed in a single room within the local high school. However, throughout the years, the museum and the artifacts it contained grew larger. They eventually broke ground for a permanent museum building, created for the bicentennial celebration, on December 30, 1976. (Lawshe Memorial Museum)

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Yours Truly, Dining Hall

In this interactive artwork, visitors were encouraged to write postcards addressed to some of the prisoners represented in Trace. Ai has spoken of the deep feeling of isolation that afflicts incarcerated people and the fear that their causes have been forgotten. Yours Truly is a direct response to these concerns—serving as a reminder that their voices and causes have not been forgotten, and as a springboard for visitors to engage in a global conversation about the responsibilities that we all bear as members of the international community. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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Blossom, Hospital

With intricately detailed encrustations of ceramic flowers, Ai transforms the utilitarian fixtures (sinks, toilets, and tubs) in several hospital ward cells and medical offices into fantastical, fragile porcelain bouquets. The profusion of flowers rendered in a cool and brittle material could be understood as an ironic reference to China’s famous Hundred Flowers Campaign of 1956, a brief period of government tolerance of free expression, immediately followed by a severe crackdown against dissent. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy) Captured by:

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Stay Tuned, A Block

An intimate and evocative sound installation, Stay Tuned invites visitors into 12 individual cells in A Block, where they can sit and listen to spoken words, poetry, and music by people who have been imprisoned for the creative expression of their beliefs—as well as works created under conditions of incarceration. The work prompts introspection and understanding of the power of the human voice as a vehicle for connection and communication in a setting of enforced isolation and silence. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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Refraction, New Industries Building

Using the imagery of flight to evoke the tension between freedom and confinement, this monumental installation—weighing more than five tons—is modeled after a bird’s wing. The artwork is composed of reflective panels originally used on Tibetan solar cookers. Located on the lower floor and viewed from the gun gallery above, the installation positions the visitor in the role of the prison guard, implicating the viewer in a complex structure of power and control. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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Refraction, with secret tunnel access

Using the imagery of flight to evoke the tension between freedom and confinement, this monumental installation—weighing more than five tons—is modeled after a bird’s wing. The artwork is composed of reflective panels originally used on Tibetan solar cookers. Located on the lower floor and viewed from the gun gallery above, the installation positions the visitor in the role of the prison guard, implicating the viewer in a complex structure of power and control. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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With Wind, New Industries Building

This large-scale installation, located in the building once used for prison labor, is based on the traditional Chinese “dragon kite” and features multiple kites strung together to create a single, large multipart kite. The stylized birds and flowers represented on each kite speak to the natural environs of Alcatraz Island—an important bird habitat—and reference 30 nations with serious records of restricting their citizens’ human rights and civil liberties. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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Rose Island Lighthouse

The Rose Island Light, built in 1870, is on Rose Island in Narragansett Bay in Newport, Rhode Island in the United States. It is preserved, maintained and operated by The Rose Island Lighthouse Foundation.

One of a group of New England lighthouses built to an award-winning design by Vermont architect Albert Dow,[3] Rose Island Light has sisters at Sabin PointPomham Rocks, and Colchester Reef. The lighthouse stands atop a bastion of Fort Hamilton, which was built in 1798-1800.

The building was abandoned as a functioning lighthouse in 1970, when the Newport Bridge was constructed nearby. In 1984, the Rose Island Lighthouse Foundation was founded to restore the dilapidated light on behalf of the City of Newport, which had received it for free from the United States government.[5] In 1987, the federal government listed the lighthouse on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1992 it was relit as a private aid to navigation.[1][2]

The lighthouse is today a travel destination, reached only by boat. For a fee to the Foundation, visitors can spend a night as a guest or a week as the “lighthouse keeper,” completing many of the chores required to keep the lighthouse in good condition. (Wikipedia)

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The September 11 Memorial Walkway of Southern Illinois

The September 11 Memorial Walkway of Southern Illinois will be dedicated to the many victims and brave respondents of the vicious attacks on America’s freedom and ideals. The Memorial will honor victims of the attacks and those who risked their lives to save others. It will recognize the thousands who survived and the remarkable compassion displayed in the aftermath.

The walkway will be located in the Belleville, IL at the Fire Department Administration Office at Illinois Route 15 and Illinois Route 159. The walkway will feature a 7,100-pound steel remnant of the World Trade Center as the centerpiece and chronicle the story of the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and Flight 93 on that fateful day. (World Trade Center Memorial Walkway
of Southern Illinois)

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Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Formerly placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now renamed Independence Hall), the bell today is located in the Liberty Bell Center in Independence National Historical Park. The bell was commissioned in 1752 by the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly from the London firm of Lester and Pack (known subsequently as the Whitechapel Bell Foundry), and was cast with the lettering “Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof,” a Biblical reference from the Book of Leviticus (25:10). The bell first cracked when rung after its arrival in Philadelphia, and was twice recast by local workmen John Pass and John Stow, whose last names appear on the bell. In its early years, the bell was used to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to alert citizens about public meetings and proclamations.

Although no immediate announcement was made of the Second Continental Congress’s vote for independence, and so the bell could not have rung on July 4, 1776, related to that vote, bells were rung on July 8 to mark the reading of the Declaration of Independence. While there is no contemporary account of the Liberty Bell ringing, most historians believe it was one of the bells rung. After American independence was secured, the bell fell into relative obscurity until, in the 1830s, the bell was adopted as a symbol by abolitionist societies, who dubbed it the “Liberty Bell.”

The bell acquired its distinctive large crack sometime in the early 19th century—a widespread story claims it cracked while ringing after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835. The bell became famous after an 1847 short story claimed that an aged bell-ringer rang it on July 4, 1776, upon hearing of the Second Continental Congress’s vote for independence. Despite the fact that the bell did not ring for independence on that July 4, the tale was widely accepted as fact, even by some historians. Beginning in 1885, the City of Philadelphia, which owns the bell, allowed it to go to various expositions and patriotic gatherings. The bell attracted huge crowds wherever it went, additional cracking occurred and pieces were chipped away by souvenir hunters. The last such journey occurred in 1915, after which the city refused further requests.

After World War II, the city allowed the National Park Service to take custody of the bell while retaining ownership. The bell was used as a symbol of freedom during the Cold War and was a popular site for protests in the 1960s. It was moved from its longtime home in Independence Hall to a nearby glass pavilion on Independence Mall in 1976, and then to the larger Liberty Bell Center adjacent to the pavilion in 2003. The bell has been featured on coins and stamps, and its name and image have been widely used by corporations. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Take the Tour Now

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Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rock is the traditional site of disembarkation of William Bradford and the Mayflower Pilgrims who founded Plymouth Colony in 1620. The Pilgrims did not refer to Plymouth Rock in any of their writings; the first known recorded reference to the rock dates to 1715 when it was described in the town boundary records as “a great rock.” The first documented claim that Plymouth Rock was the landing place of the Pilgrims was made by Elder Thomas Faunce in 1741, 121 years after the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth. From that time to the present, Plymouth Rock has occupied a prominent spot in American tradition and has been interpreted by later generations as a symbol both of the virtues and flaws of the first English people who colonized New England. In 1774, the rock broke in half during an attempt to haul it to Town Square in Plymouth. The top portion (the fragment now visible) sat in Town Square, was moved to Pilgrim Hall Museum in 1834, and was returned to its original site on the shore of Plymouth Harbor in 1880. Today it is ensconced beneath a granite canopy designed by McKim, Mead & White. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: AerialOptics

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“Air Force One” Boeing VC-137B

The Flying Oval Office

The first presidential jet plane, a specially built Boeing 707-120, is known as SAM (Special Air Missions) 970. This aircraft, as well as any other Air Force aircraft, carried the call sign “Air Force One” when the president was aboard. Delivered in 1959 to replace Eisenhower’s Super-Constellation, the high-speed jet transport is a flying Oval Office with a modified interior and sophisticated communication equipment.

Jet technology gave a president the opportunity to meet face-to-face with world leaders easily. SAM 970 has carried presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon as well as VIPs such as Nikita Khrushchev and Henry Kissinger.

By 1962, SAM 970 was replaced by a newer Boeing VC-137C. But SAM 970 remained in the presidential fleet ferrying VIPs and the Vice-President until June of 1996.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Museum of Flight)

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Miguasha National Park

Captured by: ExploraTerra

Miguasha National Park is a protected area near Carleton-sur-Mer on the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec in Canada. Created in 1985 by the Government of Quebec, Miguasha was designated a World Heritage Site in 1999 in recognition of its wealth of fossils, which display a crucial time during the evolution of life on Earth. Other names for this site are the Miguasha Fossil Site, the Bay of Escuminac Fossil Site, the Upper Devonian Escuminac Formation, and the Hugh-Miller Cliffs. It is also sometimes referred to on fossil specimens as ‘Scaumenac Bay’ or ‘Scaumenac Bay P.Q.’ (Wikipedia)

Wampanoag Homesite Wetu

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Pilgrim Villager House

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Helen Keller’s Birthplace

Captured by: Scott & Kristal Riddle

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deaf-blind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree. The story of how Keller’s teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Her birthplace in West Tuscumbia, Alabama, is now a museum and sponsors an annual “Helen Keller Day”. Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, the 100th anniversary of her birth.

A prolific author, Keller was well-traveled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women’s suffrage, labor rights, socialism, anti-militarism, and other similar causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame in 1971 and was one of twelve inaugural inductees to the Alabama Writers Hall of Fame on June 8, 2015. Keller proved to the world that deaf people could all learn to communicate and that they could survive in the hearing world. She also taught that deaf people are capable of doing things that hearing people can do. One of the most famous deaf people in history, she is an idol to many deaf people in the world. (Wikipedia)