Boeing CH-47D Chinook “My Old Lady”

My Old Lady was was built in 1962, and on Jan. 9, 1963 it became the fifth Chinook accepted by the U.S. Army (91-00261). The twin-engined helo accommodates a crew of 2-3 and up to 50 troops. It has served with the U. S. Army and Army National Guard, and based at Camp Murray near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington since 2009. The aircraft flew combat missions in Iraq, Kuwait and Afghanistan during 2009-2011. Locally it was flown in support of domestic emergencies, most recently the Okanogan Complex Wildfire in 2015. It is the only authorized U.S. Army aircraft with nose art. My Old Ladywas the oldest flyable Chinook in the world-wide Army inventory when it was taken off of flight status in 2017 after 54 years of service.

CH-47 models entered combat service in 1965 during the Vietnam War. The Chinooks were vital to many aspects of the war including troop transport, placing artillery batteries in mountain positions inaccessible by other means, and recovering downed aircraft. Chinooks retrieved 11,500 disabled aircraft, worth over 3 billion U.S. dollars throughout the conflict. (Museum of Flight)(Museum of Flight)

Burgas Aviation Museum

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The museum of aviation is located at the entrance to Burgas Airport. The museum was opened in 2017 and it is a great place for spending leisure time.

The exposition includes civil and military aircrafts that were part of the Bulgarian Aviation in the period 1960 – 1996. In the Museum of Aviation in Burgas can be seen TU-154 and AN-12 that are the last of their kind in Bulgaria. The impressive interactive exposition Homo Volans (The Flying Man) is placed in AN-12. It includes many authentic objects, airplane models, costumes, interactive installations and archives from the aviation history.

Unique experience for the visitors is also the ability to “navigate” an airplane with VR glasses.

Newark Aviation Museum

Newark Air Museum is an air museum located on a former Royal Air Force station at Winthorpe, near Newark-on-Trent in Nottinghamshire, England. The museum contains a variety of aircraft. Its address is 45 Lincoln Road. (Wikipedia)

New England Patriots vs Houston Texans: F-15 Flyover

Brady, Gronk open season with 27-20 win over Texans

Tom Brady threw for 277 yards and three touchdowns, hitting Rob Gronkowski for 123 yards and a score Sunday to lead the defending AFC champion New England Patriots to a 27-20 victory over the Houston Texans.

Scoring Summary

FIRST QUARTER HOU NE
TD
11:50
Rob Gronkowski 21 Yd pass from Tom Brady (Stephen Gostkowski Kick)
3 plays, 19 yards, 1:08
0 7
FG
2:33
Ka’imi Fairbairn 42 Yd Field Goal
4 plays, -7 yards, 1:33
3 7
SECOND QUARTER HOU NE
TD
12:38
James White 12 Yd pass from Tom Brady (Stephen Gostkowski Kick)
10 plays, 75 yards, 4:55
3 14
FG
9:01
Ka’imi Fairbairn 36 Yd Field Goal
9 plays, 44 yards, 3:37
6 14
TD
0:14
Phillip Dorsett 4 Yd pass from Tom Brady (Stephen Gostkowski Kick)
8 plays, 78 yards, 1:14
6 21
THIRD QUARTER HOU NE
FG
6:02
Stephen Gostkowski 39 Yd Field Goal
10 plays, 63 yards, 3:50
6 24
TD
1:52
Alfred Blue 1 Yd Run (Ka’imi Fairbairn Kick)
10 plays, 68 yards, 4:10
13 24
FOURTH QUARTER HOU NE
FG
9:48
Stephen Gostkowski 35 Yd Field Goal
13 plays, 58 yards, 7:04
13 27
TD
2:08
Bruce Ellington 5 Yd pass from Deshaun Watson (Ka’imi Fairbairn Kick)
6 plays, 16 yards, 2:24
20 27

Gulfstream G550

The Gulfstream G550 is a business jet aircraft produced by General Dynamics’ Gulfstream Aerospace unit in Savannah, Georgia, US. The certification designation is GV-SP. There were 450 Gulfstream G550s in active service as of January 2016. A version with reduced fuel capacity was marketed as the G500. Wikipedia
SN: 5045
Range7,767.8 mi
Top speed585 mph
Wingspan94′ 0″
Unit cost42,000,000–42,000,000 USD (2010)
Number built580+ as of June 2019
Produced2003–present

Super Guppy

The Aero Spacelines Super Guppy is a large, wide-bodied cargo aircraft that was used for hauling outsize cargo components in 1962. It was the successor to the Pregnant Guppy, the first of the Guppy aircraft produced by Aero Spacelines. Five were built in two variants, both of which were colloquially referred to as the “Super Guppy”. This is the second.

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Northrop F-5A Freedom Fighter

The capture was done during a temporal expo by Air Museum of Madrid in the city of Gijon. The Northrop F-5A and F-5B Freedom Fighter and the F-5E and F-5F Tiger II are part of a supersonic light fighter family, initially designed in the late 1950s by Northrop Corporation. Being smaller and simpler than contemporaries such as the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II, the F-5 cost less to both procure and operate, making it a popular export aircraft. The F-5 started life as a privately funded light fighter program by Northrop in the 1950s. The design team wrapped a small, highly aerodynamic fighter around two compact and high-thrust General Electric J85 engines, focusing on performance and low cost of maintenance.

Logan County Transportation Museum

The Logan County Transportation Museum addition opened in April 2014. The building was designed by architect Karen Beasley of Beasley Architecture and Design in Bellefontaine. It was designed in the spirit of the Big Four/New York Central Roundhouse railroad that stood in Bellefontaine from the late 1890s to the 1960s.

The building was made possible through a Transportation Enhancement Grant from the Ohio Department of Transportation. The ODOT grant paid 80% of the $3 million project. The Historical Society raised the rest of the money through donations from local businesses, industries and individuals. The complete list of donors can be seen in the entry of the Transportation

Museum, as well as a dedication board acknowledging many individuals who played a key role in the project.

The first floor bays are dedicated to numerous exhibits on Logan County’s important role in transportation.

The second floor houses the Logan County Genealogical Society and their library and the Logan County Historical Society’s Archives, as well as the AcuSport Meeting Room.

World War II Glider & Military Museum

The World War II Glider and Military Museum opened in July 2011, features one of only seven fully-restored CG-4A gliders in the world, as well as extensive military displays. During World War II, the Ford Motor Company’s plant in Kingsford built more Model CG-4A gliders for the United States Army than any other company in the nation at much less cost than other manufacturers. (Menominee Range Historical Foundation)

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Boeing 737-130 Prototype

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The Prototype “Baby Boeing”

The 737 is the smallest and most popular jetliner in the Boeing airline family. Since 1967, over 8,000 “Baby Boeings” have been built or ordered. The short-haul 737 is dependable, economical and can operate from unprepared grass and gravel runways — making it a popular choice of many airlines throughout the world.

The Museum’s aircraft is the first production 737. The prototype made its first flight with Brien Wygle and Lew Wallick at the controls on April 9, 1967. Boeing used the 737 as a flight test aircraft before it became NASA’s Transport Systems Research Vehicle in 1974. Based at the Langley Research Center in Virginia, the 737 was used to test many technological innovations including a virtual cockpit, electronic flight displays, and airborne wind shear detection systems.

NASA Pilot

“The 737 was a wonderful plane,” says NASA research pilot Lee Person. “It could do things that other airplanes simply couldn’t.” High praise from the former Marine fighter pilot who’s flown over 130 aircraft in his 41-year career, including the Hawker XV-6A Kestrel (forerunner to the Harrier jet fighter). From 1974 to 1995, Person and fellow pilot Dick Yenni flew the 737 prototype in more than 20 different aerial research projects for NASA.

This aircraft is on loan from NASA, Langley Research Center. (Museum of Flight)

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Boeing 727-022

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One of the world’s classic airliners, the Boeing 727 was developed to provide economic low-altitude, high-speed cruising capability. From the time it was first flown, in February of 1963, until production ended in 1984, a total of 1,832 had rolled off factory lines and had seen service with more than 100 different airlines.

The Museum’s airplane was the first 727 ever produced. Following the conclusion of Boeing’s flight-test program, it entered regular passenger service with United Airlines. On March 2, 2016, this aircraft made one last flight from the Museum’s Restoration Center to Boeing Field where it will remain on display through the Summer and moved into a permanent display in the Aviation Pavilion in Fall, 2016. (Museum of Flight)

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Boeing 247D

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The first modern airliner, the Boeing 247 marked the beginning of a new era. Versatile, easy to maneuver, and economical to operate, the 247 quickly outperformed other transports of the period. United Air Lines, which had a monopoly on the production of 247s, was soon outdistancing its competition. This forced TWA to go to Douglas Aircraft to request a new plane which could compete with — even outperform — the 247. The result of this challenge was the development of one of the most significant planes in aviation history — the Douglas DC-3. (Museum of Flight)

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Antonov An-2 Colt

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According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the Antonov An-2 Colt’s 45-year production run is one of the longest ever for any aircraft. The plane is the workhorse of underdeveloped countries, prized for its multi-use capabilities, extraordinary slow-flight and short takeoff and landing capabilities, and its ability to handle extreme weather conditions and unimproved runways.

The An-2 is the largest single-engine biplane ever produced, in addition to its home factory in the former Soviet Union the plane has seen production runs in the Ukraine, Poland, and China. Fitted with a 1,000-horsepower 9-cylinder Shvetsov ASH-62 radial engine, the An-2 has no stall speed recorded in its operating handbook and pilots have been known to fly the biplane under full control at 30 mph. A note from the pilot’s handbook reads:

“If the engine quits in instrument conditions (blind flying when you can’t see the ground) or at night, the pilot should pull the control column full aft (it won’t stall) and keep the wings level. The leading-edge slats will snap out at about 40mph (64km/h), and when the airplane slows to a forward speed of about 25mph [40km/h], the airplane will sink at about a parachute descent rate until the aircraft hits the ground.”

In 1998, The Museum of Flight’s An-2 Antonov named Polar 1 participated in a commemorative polar flight honoring the fight originally made from Barrow, Alaska, USA to Spitsbergen, Norway in April of 1928 by Eielson and Wilkins. The Museum’s aircraft landed at the North Pole on April 13, 1998, and was donated at the completion of the return flight by owner Shane Lundgren. (Museum of Flight)

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Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner

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This particular 787, ZA003, was the third Dreamliner built. It first flew on March 14, 2010. In addition to its role in the flight test and certification program, Boeing flew Number 3 to 23 countries during a global showcase of the 787 called the Dream Tour. While on exhibit at the Museum, the airplane’s interior will be partially configured as an airliner and flight test aircraft, with the remaining space devoted to displays covering the development of the 787, including artifacts from the program. (Museum of Flight)

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Boeing 747-121 Prototype

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The growing worldwide demand for air travel during the 1960s led to the development of the 747, the first “Jumbo Jet.” Merely recalling the early days of the 747 program “brings sweat to the palms of my hands,” Boeing’s then-president, William Allen, said years after the giant aircraft had been developed. Requiring the company to risk much of its net worth, the development of the world’s largest passenger aircraft was a formidable undertaking. It is taller than a six-story building, has seating for 374 passengers (up to 550 in some configurations), a takeoff weight of more than 300 tons (or ten fully-loaded 18 wheel trucks), and enough fuel in its tanks to power a small automobile around the globe 36 times. The 747 is one the most recognizable aircraft in the world and represents a milestone in the evolution of aviation design.

The Museum of Flight’s aircraft was the first 747 ever built – serial number 001. It first flew on February 9, 1969, over Western Washington. Later, this aircraft served as a testbed for 747 systems improvements and new engine developments for other Boeing commercial jets, including the state-of-the-art Boeing 777 engine program. (Museum of Flight)

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Consolidated B-24J Liberator | Collings Foundation

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This plane is the world’s only fully restored and flying Consolidated B-24J Liberator. The restoration took over five years and 97,000+ hours and involved original crew members and builders. Today, she is painted as “Witchcraft” in honor of the veterans of the 8th Air Force, who flew in the European Theater during WWII. The plan visits over 120 cities nationwide each year, flying as part of the Wings of Freedom Tour with the Collings Foundation. More than 18,000 Consolidated B-24 Liberator planes were built, making it one of the most produced heavy bomber and multi-engine aircraft in history. During World War II, it served in every branch of the US Armed Forces and in every combat theater. Design improvements allowed the plane a long range, high speed, and heavy bomb load. The Collings Foundation organizes living history events to help Americans learn more about their heritage through direct participation.

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Concorde

British and French aerospace companies collaborated to design and build 20 Concorde aircraft between 1966 and 1979. Flying with Air France and British Airways, the supersonic jets offered a luxurious and speedy trip across the Atlantic for 27 years. Capable of speeds over two times the speed of sound and at altitudes up to 60,000 feet (18,290 m), the Concorde could fly from London to New York and return in the time it took a conventional aircraft to go one way. Flagging demand and rising operating expenses finally ended Concorde service — symbolizing a lost era of luxury travel.

The Museum’s aircraft, registration code G-BOAG, is referred to as “Alpha Golf.” It was first flown in April 1978 and delivered to British Airways in 1980. Equipped with four powerful Rolls-Royce/SNECMA Olympus 593 Mk. 610 turbojet engines, the Alpha Golf logged more than 5,600 takeoffs and over 16,200 flight hours while in service. The Museum’s aircraft retirement flight was on Nov. 5, 2003. On its way to The Museum of Flight, the Alpha Golf set a New York City-to-Seattle speed record of 3 hours, 55 minutes, and 12 seconds. Much of the flight was over northern Canada, where it flew supersonic for 1 hour, 34 minutes and 4 seconds. (Museum of Flight)

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Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress

“Flying Fortress” because of its many machine gun mounts. Only a few of these historic aircrafts survive today. In this model, you can explore the entire body of the plane, including the cockpit, bombardier’s seat, radio room, and the fuselage.This particular aircraft was restored to wartime configuration by The Collings Foundation. It is named “Nine-O-Nine” in honor of a 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron plane of the same name which completed 140 missions without an abort or loss of a single crewman. Today, she flies as part of the Wings of Freedom tour. The Collings Foundation organizes living history events to help Americans learn more about their heritage through direct participation. (Matterport)

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Boeing B-29 Superfortress

The Boeing B-29 Superfortress is a heavy bomber used primarily by the United State in both World War II and the Korean War. This particular plane, known as T-Square 54, flew 37 bombing missions with the 87th Bomb Squadron, 498th Bomb Group in World War II and was converted to an aerial refueling tanker for the Korean War. Today, this Boeing B-29 can be found in the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington. (Matterport)

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Air Ambulance Eurocopter EC135

The Eurocopter EC135 (now Airbus Helicopters H135) is a twin-engine civil light utility helicopter produced by Airbus Helicopters (formerly known as Eurocopter). It is capable of flight under instrument flight rules (IFR) and is outfitted with digital flight controls. It entered service in 1996; over a thousand aircraft have been produced to date. It is widely used by police and ambulance services and for executive transport; by 2013, more than 500 EC135s were providing helicopter emergency medical services across the world. While the EC135 is primarily used by civil operators, a combat-capable military-orientated variant of the EC135, designated as the Eurocopter EC635, has also been produced. (Wikipedia)

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Royal Air Force Vulcan Bomber

The Avro Vulcan (later Hawker Siddeley Vulcan from July 1963) is a jet-powered tailless delta wing high-altitude strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A.V. Roe and Company (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the most technically advanced and hence the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles.

The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War between the United Kingdom and Argentina in 1982.

The Vulcan had no defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. Electronic countermeasures were employed by the B.1 (designated B.1A) and B.2 from circa 1960. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid-1970s nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refueling.

After retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named “The Spirit of Great Britain” was restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426, and XM655, have been kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. B.2 XH558 flew for the last time in October 2015, before also being kept in taxiable condition at Doncaster Sheffield Airport. (Wikipedia)

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“Air Force One” Boeing VC-137B

The Flying Oval Office

The first presidential jet plane, a specially built Boeing 707-120, is known as SAM (Special Air Missions) 970. This aircraft, as well as any other Air Force aircraft, carried the call sign “Air Force One” when the president was aboard. Delivered in 1959 to replace Eisenhower’s Super-Constellation, the high-speed jet transport is a flying Oval Office with a modified interior and sophisticated communication equipment.

Jet technology gave a president the opportunity to meet face-to-face with world leaders easily. SAM 970 has carried presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon as well as VIPs such as Nikita Khrushchev and Henry Kissinger.

By 1962, SAM 970 was replaced by a newer Boeing VC-137C. But SAM 970 remained in the presidential fleet ferrying VIPs and the Vice-President until June of 1996.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Museum of Flight)

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NASA Shuttle Fuselage Trainer

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The FFT is a full-scale mockup of the space shuttle orbiter — without the wings. It was used as a testbed for upgrades to the shuttle fleet and for astronaut training such as extra-vehicular activity (EVA) and emergency egress. Built at Johnson Space Center in the 1970s, it was the oldest mockup in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF). The FFT includes flight-quality systems, such as a payload bay, lighting and closed circuit TV (CCTV).

The Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF) was located inside Building 9 of Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. It housed several space shuttle mockups, including the FFT, as well as mockups of every major pressurized module on the International Space Station. It was primarily used for astronaut training and systems familiarization.

It typically took at least a year and sometimes longer for astronauts to train, depending on the objectives of the mission. Each crew spent up to 100 hours training in the SVMF in more than 20 separate classes.

While many of the systems in the SVMF are flight-like, they do not contain what is generally known as simulators (as used to train pilots). Instead, the FFT and other trainers in the SVMF were used for astronaut training in housekeeping, in-flight maintenance, stowage familiarity, ingress/egress, etc.

It took a versatile team comprising a variety of skills and experience to develop, maintain and operate the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility. Specialists such as designers, engineers, project managers, electronic technicians and shop technicians were used to create the accurate mockups to train astronauts, test systems, and procedures, and serve as gravity-bound simulations. (Museum of Flight)