Exploratorium

The Exploratorium is a museum in San Francisco that allows visitors to explore the world through science, art, and human perception. Its mission is to create inquiry-based experiences that transform learning worldwide.(Wikipedia)

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Bruentrup Heritage Farm

The Bruentrup Heritage Farm was established in 1891. William Bruentrup married Ida Wagner and the bride’s family gave them 40 acres of land along White Bear Avenue as a wedding present. They added land until it reached 175 acres. Four generations of the family have farmed there. The farmhouse was somewhat modernized in 1912.

Over the years the surrounding land was being developed. A large part of the Bruentrup property had been sold, including the many acres where Maplewood Mall is now located. In 1997 the developers offered the Bruentrup family a very good price for their land. The Bruentrup’s offered the City of Maplewood the first chance to buy it. The City sent out a questionnaire to the citizens of Maplewood. The responses were very positive to the idea of saving the farm in that location.

Maplewood Area Historical Society
The newly formed Maplewood Area Historical Society became interested at that time. Private citizens and local businesses were sent pledge forms. The Historical Society raised over $20,000, but time was running out and the developers purchased the property. A group of Society members convinced our State Legislators to carry a bill to fund the moving of the farm buildings on to City-owned Open Space. The bill passed with the help of many citizen lobbyists.

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The farm buildings were moved in 1999. The house, barn, granary, machine shed and metal foundry building and 1 hundred years of farming artifacts were all moved to 2 1/2 acres donated by the City. This land is adjacent to 25 acres of City-owned prairie preserve. This preservation effort was a winner of the Historic Preservation Award in the year 2000. Because of the hundreds of volunteers, individuals, local businesses, labor unions, and the Bruentrup family we have been able to get the house, some of the buildings and the grounds in excellent condition. The work will continue. We welcome visitors to the Bruentrup Farm which is located 2 blocks east of Maplewood Mall on County Road D. (Maplewood Area Historical Society) Captured by: Nienow Cultural Consultants

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Sibley Historic Site

Visit the oldest Euro-American settlement in Minnesota where four distinctive limestone buildings grace the Minnesota River bluff across from Historic Fort Snelling. These buildings mark the American Fur Company’s control over the region’s Dakota trade between 1825 and 1853, when Mendota was a major center of the region’s fur trade. The Sibley Historic Site is on the southern bluff of the Minnesota River upstream from its confluence with the Mississippi. The site includes four of Minnesota’s oldest buildings, including the home of Henry Hastings Sibley — fur trader, General, and controversial first Governor of Minnesota. The Sibley Historic Site offers events, seasonal guided tours, and a museum shop.

About Henry Sibley
Born on Feb. 20, 1811, in Detroit, Henry Hastings Sibley came to the junction of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers in 1834 as the regional manager of the American Fur Company. Sibley went on to become one of the most influential figures in Minnesota history. His career included working as the region’s most prominent fur trader; serving as a politician and territorial delegate to the U.S. Congress; election as the first governor of the state of Minnesota; and serving as a general during the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862.

The site of Sibley’s Mendota home (and eventually those of Jean Baptiste Faribault and Hypolite DuPuis) became the state’s first designated historic site, with restoration undertaken by the Minnesota district of the Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.) in 1910. The site is now owned by the Minnesota Historical Society and operated by the Dakota County Historical Society.

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William G. LeDuc House

A Short History

LeDuc Mansion with ScaffoldingConstruction on the LeDuc house began in 1862 and was completed in 1866.  Following LeDuc’s service as Quartermaster in the Civil War, the family moved into the unfinished home in August 1865.  In March 1865 he had been brevetted a brigadier general for “efficiency, intelligence, and zeal in the discharge of his duties”.

William G. LeDuc came to St. Paul, Minnesota Territory in 1850 from Ohio to open a bookstore and law office.  In 1854 he purchased a quarter share in the town of Hastings from Alexander Faribault.  In 1856, he and his wife Mary Bronson LeDuc, with their two daughters moved downriver to Hastings, where they had also acquired two wheat farms and 160 acres with a small grist mill on the falls of the Vermillion River. It was on this property that William and Mary decided to build their dream home.

They chose a Gothic Revival home featured in Andrew Jackson Downing’s 1852 book Cottage Residences.  Downing was a pioneer in American landscape architect and author, whose reputation as a horticulturist was widespread.  He inspired Americans to surround their homes with the beauty of nature and encouraged the use of good design even in planning farmsteads.  More mansion than a cottage, the house has ten fireplaces; its limestone walls are three feet thick and, except for the cherry staircase rail, all the woodwork is made from white pine finished at the site. William and Mary chose three Downing designs for their rural home site; their residence, Carriage Barn, and Ice House. The estate is a complete example of the Gothic Revival style of Andrew Jackson Downing.

Carroll Simmons, a friend of the LeDuc grandchildren, purchased the home in 1940 for his antique business. In 1958 he donated the home and outbuildings with 4 acres to the Minnesota Historical Society (MHS), with the agreement that he would continue using it for his antique business until he retired, which wasn’t until 1986. Between 1986 and 2003 the future of the property was uncertain.  Although it was the first property acquired by MHS, they had opened other house museums by the time they took possession.  Needed repairs were done on the house and carriage barn, but the property stood empty.

Citizen groups actively sought out ways to fulfill Carroll Simmons’ vision of having the LeDuc house open to the public.  In 2002 the Minnesota Legislature apportioned 1.2 million dollars in bonding funds for MHS to preserve the house and bring it up to current building codes.  Agreements were executed between the Minnesota Historical Society, the City of Hastings and the Dakota County Historical Society, which resulted in city ownership and DCHS management of the site.

The site opened for tours on May 22, 2005.  June 24, 2005, the Minnesota Historical Society deaccessioned the LeDuc House to the City of Hastings. As part of the agreement, the Society transferred $604,000 of net assets provided by Carroll Simmons for endowment, repairs, and maintenance of the LeDuc House.

 

 

 

Sources:

Original Record (Civil War) I Vol. 52, Part I, pg. 663.

An American Gothic: The Life & Times & Legacy of William Gates LeDuc, Steve Werle, Dakota County Historical Society, 2004

This Business of War; Recollections of a Civil War Quartermaster, William G. LeDuc, Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1963

Hastings Star Gazette, 3-20-2003

Minnesota Historical Society Annual Report, 2005

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Lawshe Memorial Museum

Lawshe Memorial Museum was created to protect, understand and share the history of the community, the Dakota County Historical Society was created in 1939.  They did not have a museum until 1955, and even then it was small, housed in a single room within the local high school. However, throughout the years, the museum and the artifacts it contained grew larger. They eventually broke ground for a permanent museum building, created for the bicentennial celebration, on December 30, 1976. (Lawshe Memorial Museum)

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Yours Truly, Dining Hall

In this interactive artwork, visitors were encouraged to write postcards addressed to some of the prisoners represented in Trace. Ai has spoken of the deep feeling of isolation that afflicts incarcerated people and the fear that their causes have been forgotten. Yours Truly is a direct response to these concerns—serving as a reminder that their voices and causes have not been forgotten, and as a springboard for visitors to engage in a global conversation about the responsibilities that we all bear as members of the international community. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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Blossom, Hospital

With intricately detailed encrustations of ceramic flowers, Ai transforms the utilitarian fixtures (sinks, toilets, and tubs) in several hospital ward cells and medical offices into fantastical, fragile porcelain bouquets. The profusion of flowers rendered in a cool and brittle material could be understood as an ironic reference to China’s famous Hundred Flowers Campaign of 1956, a brief period of government tolerance of free expression, immediately followed by a severe crackdown against dissent. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy) Captured by:

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Stay Tuned, A Block

An intimate and evocative sound installation, Stay Tuned invites visitors into 12 individual cells in A Block, where they can sit and listen to spoken words, poetry, and music by people who have been imprisoned for the creative expression of their beliefs—as well as works created under conditions of incarceration. The work prompts introspection and understanding of the power of the human voice as a vehicle for connection and communication in a setting of enforced isolation and silence. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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Refraction, New Industries Building

Using the imagery of flight to evoke the tension between freedom and confinement, this monumental installation—weighing more than five tons—is modeled after a bird’s wing. The artwork is composed of reflective panels originally used on Tibetan solar cookers. Located on the lower floor and viewed from the gun gallery above, the installation positions the visitor in the role of the prison guard, implicating the viewer in a complex structure of power and control. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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Refraction, with secret tunnel access

Using the imagery of flight to evoke the tension between freedom and confinement, this monumental installation—weighing more than five tons—is modeled after a bird’s wing. The artwork is composed of reflective panels originally used on Tibetan solar cookers. Located on the lower floor and viewed from the gun gallery above, the installation positions the visitor in the role of the prison guard, implicating the viewer in a complex structure of power and control. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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With Wind, New Industries Building

This large-scale installation, located in the building once used for prison labor, is based on the traditional Chinese “dragon kite” and features multiple kites strung together to create a single, large multipart kite. The stylized birds and flowers represented on each kite speak to the natural environs of Alcatraz Island—an important bird habitat—and reference 30 nations with serious records of restricting their citizens’ human rights and civil liberties. (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

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New Brighton Area History Center

The New Brighton Area Historical Society (NBAHS);  DSC1129the Exchange Hotel in 1891, built to accommodate the cattlemen coming to the stockyards; the Bulwer Junction Depot, now the New Brighton History Center; the stockyards at the turn of the century; and the railroad, all of which helped put New Brighton on the map.

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Theurer-Wrigley Mansion

The Theurer-Wrigley House, or “Wrigley Mansion”, is located in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. This gargantuan 13,000 square foot home was built in 1896 and is a wonderful example of Chicago’s architectural history with its Italian Rennaissance & Craftsman qualities. As its name suggests, the home was originally built for Schoenhofen Brewing Company owner Joseph Theurer, but was later owned by Chicago’s well-known Wrigley family. The expansive interior has been well preserved and the beautiful woodwork and ornate details can be seen throughout. With nine bedrooms, a grand ballroom, and a carriage house, this historic property is a must-see! (Matterport)

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Rose Island Lighthouse

The Rose Island Light, built in 1870, is on Rose Island in Narragansett Bay in Newport, Rhode Island in the United States. It is preserved, maintained and operated by The Rose Island Lighthouse Foundation.

One of a group of New England lighthouses built to an award-winning design by Vermont architect Albert Dow,[3] Rose Island Light has sisters at Sabin PointPomham Rocks, and Colchester Reef. The lighthouse stands atop a bastion of Fort Hamilton, which was built in 1798-1800.

The building was abandoned as a functioning lighthouse in 1970, when the Newport Bridge was constructed nearby. In 1984, the Rose Island Lighthouse Foundation was founded to restore the dilapidated light on behalf of the City of Newport, which had received it for free from the United States government.[5] In 1987, the federal government listed the lighthouse on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1992 it was relit as a private aid to navigation.[1][2]

The lighthouse is today a travel destination, reached only by boat. For a fee to the Foundation, visitors can spend a night as a guest or a week as the “lighthouse keeper,” completing many of the chores required to keep the lighthouse in good condition. (Wikipedia)

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Lincoln Heritage Museum

Abraham Lincoln is perhaps one of the most universally renowned and admired individuals in all of world history. His name is familiar in all corners of the globe. Visitors from all over the world come to the United States to learn more about who Abraham Lincoln was, as in many ways Lincoln is who America is. Our Lincoln Heritage Museum has been such a destination, as we witness visitors from nearly every state and many countries annually.

The Lincoln Heritage Museum allows visitors to appreciate the incredible life and legacy of Abraham Lincoln. As Lincoln famously said in his Gettysburg Address, “It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.” So it is for us to carry the lessons of Abraham Lincoln and his times to new generations. With that in mind, our mission is to interpret for the public the life and legacy of Abraham Lincoln and the world in which he lived—particularly as it pertained to Illinois—and to be an academic resource for students from elementary school through adulthood. We invite all to learn from Lincoln and live like Lincoln. (Lincoln Heritage Museum)

Captured by: Lincoln College

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Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress

“Flying Fortress” because of its many machine gun mounts. Only a few of these historic aircrafts survive today. In this model, you can explore the entire body of the plane, including the cockpit, bombardier’s seat, radio room, and the fuselage.This particular aircraft was restored to wartime configuration by The Collings Foundation. It is named “Nine-O-Nine” in honor of a 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron plane of the same name which completed 140 missions without an abort or loss of a single crewman. Today, she flies as part of the Wings of Freedom tour. The Collings Foundation organizes living history events to help Americans learn more about their heritage through direct participation. (Matterport)

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Boeing B-29 Superfortress

The Boeing B-29 Superfortress is a heavy bomber used primarily by the United State in both World War II and the Korean War. This particular plane, known as T-Square 54, flew 37 bombing missions with the 87th Bomb Squadron, 498th Bomb Group in World War II and was converted to an aerial refueling tanker for the Korean War. Today, this Boeing B-29 can be found in the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington. (Matterport)

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Remember Them: Champions for Humanity

Remember Them: Champions for Humanity honors 39 people for their contributions towards peace, freedom, and human rights in the past 150 years. The monument depicts 25 humanitarians and 14 local champions in larger-than-life bronze in downtown Oakland, CA. Behind the monument, a wall designed for the visually impaired allows visitors to explore the humanitarians through touch: it features bronze castings and well-known quotations from each in braille and large print. Remember Them was created by Oakland sculptor Mario Chiodo and unveiled on May 31, 2013.

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Mid-Century Modern Architecture Museum

In November 2015 the Belleville Historical Society purchased the Terry and Thelma Blazier House at 8501 West Main Street (#6 Oak Knoll Place) in Belleville to serve as a Midcentury Modern Architecture Museum. Belleville architect Charles E. King designed the home for the Blaziers in 1952.

In 1962 the house was converted into a funeral home, and it served that role for over 50 years. It was home to a small church when the historical society purchased it.

Several modifications had been made to the original structure, and we are now renovating the home to restore many features to their original state. Our goal is to create a house that is symbolic of Midcentury Modern (MCM) architecture featuring the work of Charles E. King. (Mid-Century Modern Architecture Museum)

Captured by: InvelopNow

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Big Island Lava Tube

Explore this unique lava tube near the Kona Airport on the Big Island of Hawaii. A lava tube, or pyroduct, is a natural conduit formed by flowing lava from a volcanic vent that moves beneath the hardened surface of a lava flow. If lava in the tube empties, it will leave a cave. Wikipedia

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Valdez Railroad Tunnel

The Valdez Railroad Tunnel was hand-cut starting in 1905. Nine companies were battling to take advantage of the short route from the coast to copper country. Progress on the tunnel was interrupted and after a gun battle, construction halted and the tunnel was never finished. You can read about the tunnel and these events in Rex Beach’s novel, The Iron Trail. (Matterport)

Captured by: Sway Array Designs

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Living Homeless

There are about 7,000 people living homeless in San Francisco, of whom about 3,000 live on the streets. Walk along 13th street, where many people were living in January 2016, to experience first-hand one of their neighborhoods. One of the people living here, Victor, gave us a tour of his tent and shared his story with us. We created these models to help bring new attention to this issue in San Francisco by letting people experience this location as if they were there. Thank you to Bill Robinson of Capture It 3D, who created this model. View stories about these models from ZDnet and 3D Printing Industry(Matterport)

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The September 11 Memorial Walkway of Southern Illinois

The September 11 Memorial Walkway of Southern Illinois will be dedicated to the many victims and brave respondents of the vicious attacks on America’s freedom and ideals. The Memorial will honor victims of the attacks and those who risked their lives to save others. It will recognize the thousands who survived and the remarkable compassion displayed in the aftermath.

The walkway will be located in the Belleville, IL at the Fire Department Administration Office at Illinois Route 15 and Illinois Route 159. The walkway will feature a 7,100-pound steel remnant of the World Trade Center as the centerpiece and chronicle the story of the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and Flight 93 on that fateful day. (World Trade Center Memorial Walkway
of Southern Illinois)

Captured by: InvelopNow

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Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Formerly placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now renamed Independence Hall), the bell today is located in the Liberty Bell Center in Independence National Historical Park. The bell was commissioned in 1752 by the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly from the London firm of Lester and Pack (known subsequently as the Whitechapel Bell Foundry), and was cast with the lettering “Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof,” a Biblical reference from the Book of Leviticus (25:10). The bell first cracked when rung after its arrival in Philadelphia, and was twice recast by local workmen John Pass and John Stow, whose last names appear on the bell. In its early years, the bell was used to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to alert citizens about public meetings and proclamations.

Although no immediate announcement was made of the Second Continental Congress’s vote for independence, and so the bell could not have rung on July 4, 1776, related to that vote, bells were rung on July 8 to mark the reading of the Declaration of Independence. While there is no contemporary account of the Liberty Bell ringing, most historians believe it was one of the bells rung. After American independence was secured, the bell fell into relative obscurity until, in the 1830s, the bell was adopted as a symbol by abolitionist societies, who dubbed it the “Liberty Bell.”

The bell acquired its distinctive large crack sometime in the early 19th century—a widespread story claims it cracked while ringing after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835. The bell became famous after an 1847 short story claimed that an aged bell-ringer rang it on July 4, 1776, upon hearing of the Second Continental Congress’s vote for independence. Despite the fact that the bell did not ring for independence on that July 4, the tale was widely accepted as fact, even by some historians. Beginning in 1885, the City of Philadelphia, which owns the bell, allowed it to go to various expositions and patriotic gatherings. The bell attracted huge crowds wherever it went, additional cracking occurred and pieces were chipped away by souvenir hunters. The last such journey occurred in 1915, after which the city refused further requests.

After World War II, the city allowed the National Park Service to take custody of the bell while retaining ownership. The bell was used as a symbol of freedom during the Cold War and was a popular site for protests in the 1960s. It was moved from its longtime home in Independence Hall to a nearby glass pavilion on Independence Mall in 1976, and then to the larger Liberty Bell Center adjacent to the pavilion in 2003. The bell has been featured on coins and stamps, and its name and image have been widely used by corporations. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Take the Tour Now

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Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rock is the traditional site of disembarkation of William Bradford and the Mayflower Pilgrims who founded Plymouth Colony in 1620. The Pilgrims did not refer to Plymouth Rock in any of their writings; the first known recorded reference to the rock dates to 1715 when it was described in the town boundary records as “a great rock.” The first documented claim that Plymouth Rock was the landing place of the Pilgrims was made by Elder Thomas Faunce in 1741, 121 years after the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth. From that time to the present, Plymouth Rock has occupied a prominent spot in American tradition and has been interpreted by later generations as a symbol both of the virtues and flaws of the first English people who colonized New England. In 1774, the rock broke in half during an attempt to haul it to Town Square in Plymouth. The top portion (the fragment now visible) sat in Town Square, was moved to Pilgrim Hall Museum in 1834, and was returned to its original site on the shore of Plymouth Harbor in 1880. Today it is ensconced beneath a granite canopy designed by McKim, Mead & White. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: AerialOptics

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“Air Force One” Boeing VC-137B

The Flying Oval Office

The first presidential jet plane, a specially built Boeing 707-120, is known as SAM (Special Air Missions) 970. This aircraft, as well as any other Air Force aircraft, carried the call sign “Air Force One” when the president was aboard. Delivered in 1959 to replace Eisenhower’s Super-Constellation, the high-speed jet transport is a flying Oval Office with a modified interior and sophisticated communication equipment.

Jet technology gave a president the opportunity to meet face-to-face with world leaders easily. SAM 970 has carried presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon as well as VIPs such as Nikita Khrushchev and Henry Kissinger.

By 1962, SAM 970 was replaced by a newer Boeing VC-137C. But SAM 970 remained in the presidential fleet ferrying VIPs and the Vice-President until June of 1996.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Museum of Flight)

https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/boeing-air-force-one-vc-25-62cc03c08f9441209d0f71fcaaf0d87b

Ohio Craft Museum

The Ohio Craft Museum is a program of Ohio Designer Craftsmen, presenting five major exhibitions each year, as well as focus exhibits and a rotating display of the permanent collection. In addition, the museum houses the Craft Research Library and offers educational workshops and events for all ages and levels of experience. Ongoing funding for Ohio Designer Craftsmen and the Ohio Craft Museum is provided by the Ohio Arts Council, Greater Columbus Arts Council, and the Columbus Foundation.

Captured by: RED 3D Virtual Reality

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Stuart Heritage Museum

George W. Parks General Merchandise Store
The museum building is wooden, made of Dade County pine, which is some of the longest-lasting variety of wood to be found. It is a 1901 tin-roof structure of vernacular architecture with a classical pioneer false-front and a gabled tin roof which was constructed and named the George W. Parks General Merchandise Store of Stuart, Florida. This historical icon situated along the St. Lucie River in downtown Stuart is some 25 miles north of West Palm Beach and one of the earliest commercial buildings in the area. (Stuart Heritage Museum)

Captured by: Drew Pittman Realty

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Mount Rainier Railroad & Logging Museum

Located in the small town of Elbe in beautiful Washington State is a heritage railroad south of Mount Rainier National Park. Passengers enjoy steam train rides through the forest and across the glacial fed Upper Nisqually River to a museum located in Mineral, Washington. Museum exhibits offer a chance to explore a comprehensive collection of steam logging locomotives and discover the stories behind the pioneers of railroad logging camps in the early to mid-1900’s. Excursions and museum visits are scheduled on summer and fall weekends with thrilling holiday excursions each winter! (Mount Rainier Railroad & Logging Museum)

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Chili Thom

Created by: RE/MAX Sea to Sky Real Estate Whistler

Michael “Chili” Thom (1976 – 2016) was a man of the mountains. A wilderness guide turned artist, he was always happiest and most comfortable when he was out exploring in nature. Teaching himself to paint at age 20, Chili found a way to take the emotion and majesty of the landscapes he loved, mostly from his home in British Columbia, and translate it onto the canvas.

Completing over 400 original pieces over his 20-year career, Chili loved to play with color, motion and the passage of time in his work.

When Chili Thom passed over to the other side in November 2016, he left a legacy. His creative spirit and enthusiasm for life inspired us to get outside, to make things happen, and to enjoy each moment spent with friends, especially out amid the power and beauty of the forests, coastlines, and mountains that he loved.

“Nature has given me a lifetime of inspiration,” Chili once said. “In just a few decades, I have seen how mankind has damaged our planet at an exponential rate. I love snow. I love clean water, fresh air, wild animals. There come’s a point where you have to look inside yourself and ask, ‘What am I willing to sacrifice to protect something that has given me the life of my dreams?'”

As an artist, Chili was known for his colorful land and seascapes, painted in layers of bright colors and featuring his distinctive, signature style. His art transports the viewer to remote places of incredible natural beauty. “In nature,” Chili believed, “there are a lot of challenges you have to power through. You suffer out a storm, or a long slog up to a summit, but you are always rewarded with something beautiful.”  Beloved throughout the Sea to Sky corridor, he was named Whistler’s “Best Artist” in the Best of Whistler poll for the 14th time in a row in 2016, and post-humously was voted “Favourite Whistlerite” for 2016. (Chili Thom Studio)

Captured by: RE/MAX Sea to Sky Real Estate Whistler

MV Polar Prince

Captured by: ExploraTerra

CCGS Sir Humphrey Gilbert was a Canadian Coast Guard light icebreaker and now a privately owned Arctic icebreaker Polar Prince. The ship entered service with the Department of Transport Marine Service in 1959 and transferred to the newly created Canadian Coast Guard in 1962, active until 1986. The icebreaker was sold to private interests in Newfoundland and the ship sat idle after 2001 until resold in 2009 to GTX Technology Canada Limited and renamed Polar Prince. Rebuilt, the icebreaker is now plying the waters of the Arctic Ocean. In 2017, the vessel was temporarily rechristened Canada C3 and used for a high-profile voyage around Canada’s three maritime coasts as part of the nation’s 150th anniversary. In 2002, the icebreaker was sold to Puddister Trading Co. Ltd of St. John’s and renamed Polar Prince. In 2002, the vessel was acquired by Star Line Inc. In 2005, the vessel was laid up at Clarenville, Newfoundland, and Labrador and put up for sale by Star Line on eBay. The vessel was later sold to GX Technologies of Calgary, Alberta in 2009 and modernized. (Wikipedia)

Kabir Kouba Waterfall

Created by: ExploraTerra

The Park of the Kabir Kouba Cliff and Waterfall is a public park in Québec (Canada) crossed by the Saint-Charles River. The rapids and falls of this section of the river are called Kabir Kouba the «river of a thousand bends» in the Montagnais language.[1] An interpretive center and trails permit the observation of the Kabir Kouba waterfall that has a height of 28 metres. The trails also provide a view of the canyon which at its highest point measures 42 metres as well as a rich variety of flora, fauna and fossils dating over 455 million years old. The interpretive center also offers services such as Kabir Kouba by Lantern, A Day at Loretteville package as well as guided visits of the falls. A song by the singer Claire PelletierKabir Kouba, evoques the many Huron legends that honour the river and the waterfall. (Wikipedia)

Cascapedia River Museum

Created by: ExploraTerra

Welcome to the Cascapedia River Museum. The Cascapedia River flows quietly through the village of Cascapedia-St Jules. If it could talk, it would tell a thousand tales about the lives of the people who lived along its banks and about those who came to experience salmon fishing in its waters. It would recount the local folklore about men who lost their lives in log drives or farmers who had to start again after flood waters receded from their fields. It would tell a story about the largest salmon taken from its waters, or about a Princess who cast her flies in fish-filled waters and painted its natural beauty. It would acquaint us with the rich and the famous who escaped their busy lives to find a sense of peace and balance in the hidden forests of the Cascapedia Valley. It would tell of the anglers who returned to their favorite fishing pools so that they could fill up on enough fishing stories to last another year.

These salmon anglers came not only for the bountiful yield of Atlantic salmon but also to share in the warmth and hospitality of the village and its way of life. The history of the Cascapedia River involves a mix of cultures that shared the river and created a distinct multicultural community. The Cascapedia River knows that it would be just another stream if it had not been for the love of the local people and the anglers who cast their fishing lines across its waters and its history.

Miguasha National Park

Captured by: ExploraTerra

Miguasha National Park is a protected area near Carleton-sur-Mer on the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec in Canada. Created in 1985 by the Government of Quebec, Miguasha was designated a World Heritage Site in 1999 in recognition of its wealth of fossils, which display a crucial time during the evolution of life on Earth. Other names for this site are the Miguasha Fossil Site, the Bay of Escuminac Fossil Site, the Upper Devonian Escuminac Formation, and the Hugh-Miller Cliffs. It is also sometimes referred to on fossil specimens as ‘Scaumenac Bay’ or ‘Scaumenac Bay P.Q.’ (Wikipedia)

Glass Room by Mozilla

Created by: Get Revolved

Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective present the Glass Room, a free exhibit that reveals the dynamics of living in the Internet age.

Jewish History Museum: Holocaust History Center

Captured by: Shots Deluxe

The Holocaust History Center at the Jewish History Museum is an educational institute dedicated to an ongoing examination of the Holocaust through the lived experiences of individuals who survived the war and later lived in Southern Arizona.  To date, over 260 individuals from 18 nations have been identified as those who were persecuted by Nazism, survived, and later arrived in southern Arizona.  These individuals, our neighbors, who have contributed to our community in numerous ways, are highlighted in the Center’s examination of this complex history. The Center purposefully situated the Holocaust along the spectrum of genocidal violence that remains a consistent feature of the human experience today. Additionally, the Holocaust History Center is committed to illuminating contemporary human rights abuses as they occur.

NASA Shuttle Fuselage Trainer

Captured by: Tosolini Productions

The FFT is a full-scale mockup of the space shuttle orbiter — without the wings. It was used as a testbed for upgrades to the shuttle fleet and for astronaut training such as extra-vehicular activity (EVA) and emergency egress. Built at Johnson Space Center in the 1970s, it was the oldest mockup in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF). The FFT includes flight-quality systems, such as a payload bay, lighting and closed circuit TV (CCTV).

The Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF) was located inside Building 9 of Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. It housed several space shuttle mockups, including the FFT, as well as mockups of every major pressurized module on the International Space Station. It was primarily used for astronaut training and systems familiarization.

It typically took at least a year and sometimes longer for astronauts to train, depending on the objectives of the mission. Each crew spent up to 100 hours training in the SVMF in more than 20 separate classes.

While many of the systems in the SVMF are flight-like, they do not contain what is generally known as simulators (as used to train pilots). Instead, the FFT and other trainers in the SVMF were used for astronaut training in housekeeping, in-flight maintenance, stowage familiarity, ingress/egress, etc.

It took a versatile team comprising a variety of skills and experience to develop, maintain and operate the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility. Specialists such as designers, engineers, project managers, electronic technicians and shop technicians were used to create the accurate mockups to train astronauts, test systems, and procedures, and serve as gravity-bound simulations. (Museum of Flight)

Living Computers: Museum + Labs (LCM+L)

Captured by: Tosolini Productions

Living Computers: Museum + Labs (LCM+L) is a computer and technology museum located in the SoDo neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. LCM+L showcases vintage computers which provide interactive sessions, either through time-sharing operating systems or single-user interfaces. This gives users a chance to actually use the computers online or in person in the museum. An expansion adds direct touch experiences with contemporary technologies such as virtual reality, self-driving cars, the internet of things, and robotics. This puts today’s computer technology in the context of how it’s being used to tackle real-world issues. LCM+L also hosts a wide range of educational programs and events in their state-of-the-art classroom and lab spaces. (Wikipedia)

Wampanoag Homesite Wetu

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Pilgrim Villager House

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Helen Keller’s Birthplace

Captured by: Scott & Kristal Riddle

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deaf-blind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree. The story of how Keller’s teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Her birthplace in West Tuscumbia, Alabama, is now a museum and sponsors an annual “Helen Keller Day”. Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, the 100th anniversary of her birth.

A prolific author, Keller was well-traveled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women’s suffrage, labor rights, socialism, anti-militarism, and other similar causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame in 1971 and was one of twelve inaugural inductees to the Alabama Writers Hall of Fame on June 8, 2015. Keller proved to the world that deaf people could all learn to communicate and that they could survive in the hearing world. She also taught that deaf people are capable of doing things that hearing people can do. One of the most famous deaf people in history, she is an idol to many deaf people in the world. (Wikipedia)

William & Florence Schmidt Art Center

Captured by: InvelopNow.com

The William and Florence Schmidt Art Center is a 6,500-square-foot art museum located on the Belleville Campus of Southwestern Illinois College, which houses a collection of over 900 works of art and artifacts, the largest permanent collection of any two-year college in the state of Illinois. In addition to paintings, photography, and pre-Columbian artifacts, the outdoor sculptures and collection were mostly acquired through private donation and funds from the Illinois Art in Architecture program.

The art center features exhibitions by professional artists within its four galleries every six to eight weeks, offers arts education programming, and hosts concerts and related cultural events. (Wikipedia)

Palace of Fine Arts

Captured by: Capture It 3D

The Palace of Fine Arts in the Marina District of San Francisco, California, is a monumental structure originally constructed for the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in order to exhibit works of art presented there. One of only a few surviving structures from the Exposition, it is still situated on its original site. It was rebuilt in 1965, and renovation of the lagoon, walkways, and a seismic retrofit were completed in early 2009.

In addition to hosting art exhibitions, it remains a popular attraction for tourists and locals and is a favorite location for weddings and wedding party photographs for couples throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and such an icon that a miniature replica of it was built in Disney’s California Adventure in Anaheim. (Wikipedia)