Salem Boys School

Constructed 1794, restored 1954

This building was built to house the school for boys in Salem, it was the first educational building built in Salem. The Salem Boys’ School, started in 1771, was for local boys to get their primary education. Gottlieb Krause, the Moravian mason, constructed the building but supposedly had assistance from an itinerant English-trained mason, William Grieg, who is attributed with showing Krause some new details, such as using a single size of brick instead of having to make many different sizes as Krause had done on previous buildings.

But in 1896 a new ‘Second’ Boys School was built on Church Street (across from the Vierling House) and the school moved, at which time the original building became a museum. The building has been used as a museum continuously since that time, first operated by the Wachovia Historical Society and since 1954 by Old Salem Museums & Gardens.

Captured by: LookingGlass.Services

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Salem Tavern

Constructed 1784, restored 1965

The Salem Tavern dates to 1784 when it was rebuilt in masonry after an earlier wooden tavern burned to the ground. Parts of the basement walls are from the original 1775 Tavern building.

The Tavern was an important facility for the town of Salem. Leaders decided to place the Tavern on the outskirts of town to avoid the influence of “strangers” on the town as much as possible; however, a tavern was necessary for the town to prosper. Food & lodging were needed for the customers Salem leaders hoped to bring in for their store and for their craftsmen.

The Tavern was owned and operated by the Moravian Church who selected a married couple to run the facility. It was important that the couple could run a successful business as well as set a good example for the Moravian community. In addition to the couple, the Tavern required several workers. A hostler and female workers were usually part of the workforce. An enslaved African American family also lived and worked in the Tavern in 1791.

Many important meetings took place at the Tavern, and several important guests stayed there. Salem’s most famous visitor stayed here in 1791. President George Washington, touring the southern battlefields of the Revolutionary War, spent two nights in Salem, attending a service, studying the waterworks system, and speaking to the townspeople.

The building reflects the special concerns of the residents, such as no front windows on the main level so that activities inside would not be visible from the streets. It had a larger lot to accommodate the barns and facilities needed for the visitors. This was also the first building by mason Johann Gottlob Krause, who built most of Salem’s largest and most important masonry buildings in the subsequent 20 years.

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John Vogler House

Constructed 1819, restored 1955

John Vogler and his new wife Christina Spach moved into the house when it was finished. John was a silversmith and was active in Salem’s community through service on church boards and leadership in the Sunday School movement. John and Christina had three children, Lisetta, Louisa, and Elias.

When you visit the Vogler house the year is 1840. Lisetta is grown and married. Elias is a teenager being schooled in Pennsylvania and returning home again. The nature of John’s business has changed with time as Salem and the entire nation moved toward a market economy with mass-produced goods. The Vogler House features the family’s public and private living spaces along with John’s shop and a scullery housing a bake oven and smithy. Many furnishings are original to the Vogler family.

The house was architecturally seminal as one of the first to follow emerging American national styles in Salem, most residences to that point had been based on traditional Germanic forms and plans. The roof lost the iconic ‘kick’ at the eaves, the facade is symmetrical, and there is a pedimented hood over the front door, with a painted clock face reflecting his trade as a clock repairer. (oldsalem.org)

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Randy’s Restaurant

Richard & Lucia Roadenizer and I have been the proprietors of Randy’s Restaurant for 37 years.   Their mission is to provide fast, friendly service along with a family-style dining experience.  During your visit, be sure to browse through our many aviation history displays.

As an Army Airborne/Air Force retired veteran, Richard gives a real insight and respect for all branches of the military.  Randy’s Restaurant hopes that it shows and when you visit you’ll leave with the same kind of feeling.

Lucia, being a native of Itay, has been known to bring in that wonderful Italian flair that our customers have grown to love.

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Riscky’s BAR-B-Q

Riscky’s BBQ has been around for over 75 years serving up the finest in mouth-watering ribs, BBQ sandwiches and chicken and so much more. The world-renowned Riscky’s barbecue is hand-rubbed with “Riscky Dust” and slow smoked for hours. According to the folks that work at Riscky’s and the customers who frequent the restaurants, Riscky’s has become a legend in Texas barbecue.

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Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park | Moore House

The Moore Cabin was restored in 1985-86 in time for its 100th birthday, and the house was restored in 1995-1997 in time for the City of Skagway’s 100th anniversary. Several interior rooms have been restored based on photographs taken by the Moores in 1904, such as the one below. The Park continues to restore the landscape surrounding the Moore House and Cabin to the 1904 period.
A visit to the restored Moore House today shows us how one family dealt with the gold rush, and their triumphs and tragedies remind us of the struggles faced by those dealing with a rapidly changing society. (National Park Service)

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Bytown Museum

The BYTOWN MUSEUM: A perfect place to begin your exploration of Ottawa, the Nation’s Capital.

bm_ryanemondHoused in Ottawa’s oldest stone structure, the BYTOWN MUSEUM explores the city’s history from the early years of Rideau Canal construction, through the rough and tumble days of Bytown, to its emergence as Canada’s capital and beyond. Enjoy unique artifacts and exhibits year-round. To assist with a pleasurable visit, and included with admission, is a six-language audio guide available in English, French, German, Spanish, Mandarin and Japanese. Combine your visit with a lovely stroll along the locks and behind the Parliament Buildings, an oasis along the Ottawa River, all within steps of the Museum. You can also head to the adjacent Byward Market for your choice of any number of delightful restaurants and wonderful shopping. A well rounded visit to begin your stay!

Our Mission

The BYTOWN MUSEUM is Ottawa’s museum and explores the stories and values of an evolving city and its residents from its first inhabitants and the early days as Bytown to present day Ottawa. The Museum is committed to engaging our visitors and community in discovery and dialogue as we aim to deepen the many connections within and between our communities.

Our Mandate

The BYTOWN MUSEUM’S mandate is to collect, preserve, study and make accessible the material and cultural heritage of the Ottawa region’s multicultural and diverse history.

Our Vision

The BYTOWN MUSEUM will provide the residents of Ottawa and visitors from abroad with a sense of identity and pride in Ottawa’s rich story. Through its collections and programs, the Museum aspires to be a model of excellence in furthering knowledge and pride of place among diverse visitors of all ages.

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Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park | Jeff. Smiths Parlor

One of Skagway’s most prominent buildings, the Jeff. Smiths Parlor Museum is forever connected to the notorious outlaw Jefferson Randolph “Soapy” Smith. Although Smith led his nefarious band of con men from its cramped rooms, he only occupied the building for three short months before his death in a gunfight. What happened to the building after Smith’s demise is an unexpected story with a surprising array of owners, uses, and relocations. In 1935, Skagway promoter Martin Itjen converted the Jeff. Smiths Parlor into a home-spun museum with gold-rush era artifacts, folk art, strange taxidermy, and even animatronic manikins. Read more… (National Park Service)

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TASCHEN & Mick Rock: David Bowie

As David Bowie’s official photographer 1972-1973, Mick Rock is in some ways the guardian of Bowie’s image. This model presents TASCHEN Gallery’sMick Rock: Shooting for Stardust, The Rise of David Bowie & Co. From formal portraits to intimate candids and backstage life to dazzling performance shots, many of the brilliant photographs have never been seen by the public. The images offer a rare look into the life of an experimental rock star through the lens of a talented photographer. The exhibit is a wild and colorful collection that will allow Bowie’s brilliance to shine on in the minds of visitors for years to come. David Bowie gained popularity in the late 1960s for his constantly morphing persona and his bold music choices, all of which kept him in the limelight for the over forty years. Bowie’s iconic image set the standard for embracing individuality in the music scene, inspiring many artists after him. He sold over 140 million albums throughout his career with famous hits including Let’s Dance, Changes, Under Pressure, and Life on Mars. His most recent album, Blackstar, was released two days before his death in January 2016 and was intended as his parting gift to the world. (Matterport)

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Shelburne Museum: Steamboat Ticonderoga

The steamboat Ticonderoga is one of two remaining side-paddle-wheel passenger steamers with a vertical beam engine of the type that provided freight and passenger service on America’s bays, lakes and rivers from the early 19th to the mid-20th centuries. Commissioned by the Champlain Transportation Company, Ticonderoga was built in 1906 at the Shelburne Shipyard in Shelburne, Vermont on Lake Champlain. (Wikipedia)

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Cave of the Mounds

Cave of the Mounds, a natural limestone cave located near Blue Mounds, Wisconsin, United States, is named for two nearby hills called the Blue Mounds. It is located in the southern slope of the east hill. (Wikipedia)

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Alexander Hamilton’s Grave

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Alexander Hamilton was one of the founding fathers of the United States and was also the first Secretary of the Treasury under George Washington’s administration. Vice President Aaron Burr and Hamilton challenged each other to a pistol duel which was the culmination of the pair’s long and bitter animosity for one another. Hamilton was mortally wounded by Burr and died the following day on July 12, 1804. Hamilton was buried in the Trinity Churchyard Cemetery in Manhattan, New York where his grave still stands today.

Great Western Staircase

The Great Western Staircase is one of the highlights of the New York State Capitol Building in Albany. Also known as the “Million Dollar Staircase”, it took fourteen years to complete at a cost of almost 1.5 million dollars. In 1894, The New York Times called the staircase “the greatest architectural work on this continent.” While that may be a bit of an overstatement, the staircase really is amazing.

Henry Hobson Richardson was the original designer, but architect Isaac G. Perry directed its construction and added a significant amount of ornamental carvings. Over 500 stone carvers worked on the project under foreman Louis Hinton.

The staircase is enormous: 119 feet in height and containing 444 steps. The predominant materials are Corsehill freestone, medina sandstone, limestone, and granite. It is illuminated throughout by light fixtures designed by Louis Hinton, and an enormous skylight on the top floor bathes the uppermost levels in natural light.

Portrait busts of great historical figures in the history of New York and the nation adorn the stonework in great profusion along with the faces of the stone carvers’ families and friends, and random people from the street. Also present are scenes from American history, various animals, and other symbols. Famous figures portrayed include:

  • Susan B. Anthony
  • Christopher Columbus
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Alexander Hamilton
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Ulysses S. Grant
  • George Washington
  • Walt Whitman

The sculpture adds a level of detail that makes exploring the staircase a little more quaint and intriguing. The staircase would probably stand as a marvel without it, but it is a nice touch. The stonework itself is massive, but the configuration of the stairways and columns is such that at times space appears almost ethereal. The numerous arches, elliptical arches, columns, and groins create a dizzying space that easily impresses.

A $2.8 million dollar restoration of the entire staircase was completed in September of 2006. A hundred years of dirt, soot, and grime have been removed from the stone and light fixtures, revealing the original beauty of the materials.

Location
Washington Ave and State Street
Albany, NY 12247

Captured by: MCWB Architects

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Running Springs Fire Department

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Our Mission: “Service to the Community”

The Running Springs Fire Department is nestled in the San Bernardino Mountains of Southern California. The Department provides Fire Protection and Paramedic Services to the community of Running Springs and surrounding areas.

The Running Springs Fire Department is a combination Full Time and Paid Call department. A full-time staff of 9 and 20 Paid Call Firefighters provides a 24-hour emergency response to a 52 square mile area. (Running Springs Fire Department)

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San Bernardino National Forest | Keller Peak Fire Lookout

The Keller Peak Fire Lookout is located at the top of Keller Peak Road just past Running Springs California.  Constructed in 1926, it is the oldest fire tower still standing in the San Bernardino National Forest.

From 1927 to 1981 the tower was manned by Forest Service personnel. In 1985, volunteers from the Rim of the World Interpretive Association manned the site after it received an extensive renovation. In 1994 the Fire Lookout Host program was created to manage all the lookouts “on the forest.” Currently, over 250 volunteers operate all the lookouts from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily during fire season. “This year alone, Keller Peak lookout volunteers have called in three ‘first responses’ to fires. They’re becoming more and more important in assisting firefighters,” said Kris Assel, executive director of the San Bernardino National Forest Association. When visitors are not on the lookout, volunteers scan for “smokes.” Trained on the Osborne, a device used to locate points within the forest, they are fully trained to let the Forest Service know the exact location of the fire. “Often our lookout volunteers assist with pinpointing exact fire locations,” said Chris Fabbro, co-coordinator of the Fire Lookout Host program.

The lookout hasn’t changed much from the time it was built by members of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The site represents one of the very few fire towers in California that were built before the Great Depression. Although cell phones make it easier for residents and visitors to report fires, the lookouts still serve as fire lookouts and also as mini visitor centers. Visitors who wish to climb the steep steps up to the tower get a beautiful view of the valley below (smog aside) and when they turn around, a view of the beautiful mountain peaks that surround the tower.

According to information from the U.S. Forest Service, the peak was named for Ally Carlin Keller who was born in San Bernardino in 1868. He was, at one time, an employee of the Forest Service. A Sierra Club history of the site says that his father, Carlin Keller, was a native of Illinois who settled, farmed and logged the area in 1854. A Serrano Indian name for this peak may have been “Kaviktaviat,” meaning “so very deep or steep that it could not be climbed.”

On Saturday, July 13, 2002, a re-dedication ceremony was held to honor nine crewmen of a B-26 bomber who were killed on December 31, 1941, when the plane they were flying crashed into Keller Peak. Apparently, had they been flying 100 feet higher the plane would have cleared the mountain. The plane had earlier been a part of a diamond formation traveling through the Cajon Pass but when the squadron encountered stormy weather, the planes separated and the B-26 at the rear of the formation failed to clear the mountain.

The lookout gives a history of the flight, along with a commemorative plaque situated near the two engines that are still on the mountainside. During Saturday’s events, a rededication of the plaque was made. The rim of the World Community Church Pastor Charles Van Kirk led the short service.

Keller Peak Fire Lookout is open to the public 9 am – 5 pm daily from Memorial Day to mid-November. This lookout is located east of Running Springs on Forest Road 1N96. This 5-mile road is paved all the way to the fire lookout. (Joan Moseley) Captured by: ReOrbitVR

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Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park | Visitor Center Museum

Today’s visitor center and museum were originally built and used by the White Pass & Yukon Route railroad. The visitor center was once the train depot and the museum housed the railroad administration. Now, these buildings are the gateway to Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park and host thousands of visitors each year. New, interactive, accessible exhibits were installed during the winter of 2016-2017. Captured by: National Park Service

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Wounded Warrior Dogs Project

The Wounded Warrior Dogs Project is a traveling exhibition of wooden dog sculptures created by master Ohio craftsman James Mellick. The dogs are intended to be symbolic of the sacrifice and exhibit the same wounds as their human companions in battle. The installation of wounded and rehabilitated dogs intends to raise awareness and focus the attention on the sacrifice and needs of wounded veterans. To this end, these sculptures are not for sale but their display is for the purpose of raising money at various exhibition venues and donations will be made to local veterans organizations that serve wounded warriors. Six dogs representing service in various wars make up this project. The seventh dog, under the flag, made the ultimate sacrifice. This display is highly evocative in content and craftsmanship.

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U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum: Exhibit

Nearly 20 years from dream to reality, the U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum has become a place to honor and preserve the legendary feats of the airborne and special operations troops who have contributed so much to defend our nation’s interests.  From the early days of the Parachute Test Platoon to the ongoing War on Terrorism, the Airborne & Special Operations Museum recounts the actions of heroic soldiers.

The doors opened on 16 August 2000, the 60th anniversary of the original Test Platoon’s first parachute jump. The museum offers free admission, the main exhibit gallery, temporary gallery, four-story-tall theater, and a motion simulator ride.

The main gallery is designed as a self-guided tour, in chronological order, through the history of airborne and special operations soldiers from 1940 to the present.  The temporary gallery changes periodically and displays a myriad of exhibits pertaining to the United States Army airborne and special operations units through their history and conflicts from World War II to the present.

The Airborne & Special Operations Museum is owned and operated by the United States Army and is part of the United States Army Museum system.

The Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation supports the museum with marketing, advertising and financial support for its programs and exhibits. (Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation)

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U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum: Entrance

Nearly 20 years from dream to reality, the U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum has become a place to honor and preserve the legendary feats of the airborne and special operations troops who have contributed so much to defend our nation’s interests.  From the early days of the Parachute Test Platoon to the ongoing War on Terrorism, the Airborne & Special Operations Museum recounts the actions of heroic soldiers.

The doors opened on 16 August 2000, the 60th anniversary of the original Test Platoon’s first parachute jump. The museum offers free admission, the main exhibit gallery, temporary gallery, four-story-tall theater, and a motion simulator ride.

The main gallery is designed as a self-guided tour, in chronological order, through the history of airborne and special operations soldiers from 1940 to the present.  The temporary gallery changes periodically and displays a myriad of exhibits pertaining to the United States Army airborne and special operations units through their history and conflicts from World War II to the present.

The Airborne & Special Operations Museum is owned and operated by the United States Army and is part of the United States Army Museum system.

The Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation supports the museum with marketing, advertising and financial support for its programs and exhibits. (Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation)

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Troy Public Library

Citizens of Troy became interested in establishing a public library long before many cities of comparable size. Discussion concerning such a library actually began with a letter from an anonymous ‘Citizen of Troy’ in the November 13, 1799 Troy Northern Budget appealing for the establishment of a public library in order to “work out the salvation of, consummate the happiness of, and conduct to every door a correction of morals and a source of mental improvement” for the people of Troy. A collection of books became available for circulation, and a group of stockholders was formed in 1800. The library’s search for a permanent home spans 96 years.

For many years the library moved to and from offices and homes of those who had been designated librarian. In 1820, Library stairs leading to reading areawhen it was housed above the River Street Drug Store of that year’s librarian, Ira Wells, 190 of its 687 volumes were destroyed by fire. By 1835, soon after the incorporation of the Troy Young Men’s Association, the library and that organization joined forces in an effort to seek a more permanent location for a public library. In 1845, the Troy Library voted to disband and turn its property over to the Troy Young Men’s Association. In 1846, the collection was moved to its first somewhat more permanent home in the Athenaeum Building, which the Young Men’s Association rented from the Troy Savings Bank. Two other important events in the library’s history took place during this period. In 1859, the first complete catalog of the Troy Young Men’s Association was produced, listing 12,067 volumes. Several copies of this catalog still exist. In 1869, the library became a Federal Government Depository Library, a status it still maintains.

In 1877 another group, the Free Reading Room of Troy, was incorporated with the goal of providing library service to the citizens of Troy. Operating since 1874, it began at the Holly Tree Inn with the cooperation of its owner, but later moved to the basement of City Hall, then to a room in the Post Office. Trustees of the Free Reading Room wished to merge their small collection with that of the Young Men’s Association and to make the entire stock available to Troy citizens at no charge. In 1879, the Young Men’s Association and the Free Reading Room came together and agreed on what they called “The Public Library Enterprise.” The Young Men’s Association later purchased the Athenaeum Building, and in 1885 Troy had its first permanently housed public library. (Troy Public Library)

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Saint Mary’s Parish – Westphalia, Michigan

The history of St. Mary’s Parish in Westphalia, Michigan, is long and rich, and is one that is difficult to summarize in just a few pages. These pages do not include all of the parish’s history, but instead highlight interesting points in its history, such as the emigration of the first settlers and their establishment of the church in Westphalia, the establishment of the Sisters of Christian Charity, and the burning of the first brick church in 1959.

THE SETTLERS
The first settlers of Westphalia arrived in the port of New York on October 3rd, 1836 aboard the Leontine from their long journey which began in the port of Bremen, Germany. Even before the emigrants sailed from Bremen, they had to travel there by land from their home in Sauerland in the western part of Germany. These first few settlers were Father Anton Kopp, St. Mary’s pioneering priest, and the Eberhard Platte family. By way of the Erie Canal, they landed in Detroit on the 25th of that same month.

Taking the advice of Father Martin Kundig of St. Mary’s Parish in Detroit, Father Anton Kopp, and Eberhard Platte set out on foot for the newly established land office in the town of Ionia. These two men traveled on foot to Ionia by Dexter Trail, passing through present-day cities and towns such as Ann Arbor, Dexter, Chelsea, Stockbridge, Mason, Lansing, and DeWitt. After arriving at the office on November 4th and waiting six days, they finally made a purchase of 560 acres which would one day become the home of St. Mary’s Parish.

Meanwhile, five men, Anton Cordes, Joseph Platte, John Hanses, William Tillmann and John Salter, were waiting in Lyons for Father Anton Kopp and Eberhard Platte. These five had also made their way along the Dexter Trail from Detroit, while the rest of their families stayed in Detroit. A hired trapper and trading post operator guided the settlers to their land-holdings. The pioneers named the settlement Westphalia in memory of their German homeland. Work began immediately to pave the wilderness into arable land. More than 300 families emigrated to Westphalia from then until 1923.

Emigrants to Westphalia came from almost every state of present-day western Germany. Early settlers came from Bavaria and the Sauerland, but later settlers came from all over Germany, as well as Poland, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Ireland. Most were from the middle-class who had acquired a trade of some sort, like blacksmithing, masonry, carpentry, or shoemaking.

The first wave of emigrants, who arrived in 1836-1860, did not flee from religious persecution. They were escaping the depressing feudal-like political system. After the overthrow of Napoleon in 1815, the great powers of Europe rearranged the map of Europe, and the Rhineland area in Germany became part of Prussia. The Germans struggled under this feudal-like political system and longed for peace and order that was not fulfilled by this map rearranging. Later emigrants, from 1871-1885, came to America to escape the religious persecution of Catholics in Germany.

SETTLING THE GRAND RIVER VALLEY
The valley of the Grand River where Westphalia is located was considered at that time worthless by the land speculators. But the settlers knew that the swampy and heavily forested land was a sign of good soil. And they were correct, as Westphalia is a thriving farming community to this day.

The German Catholic parish was established almost immediately after the settlers first arrived. After buying the land at Ionia, Father Anton Kopp traveled back to Detroit. On November 19th, the day after he arrived back in Detroit, Father Anton Kopp visited Bishop Friedrich Reese and was assigned to the new German parish. This appointment has great significance, “It was the beginning of the rural Catholic Church in Michigan,” wrote Father Kopp in his journal. Father Anton Kopp returned back to his assigned parish in September 1837 and celebrated Masses in the homes of the settlers. In March of 1838 a two-room log house, that served as the first church as well, was completed. Father Anton Kopp stayed with his parish for five years, until he left for his new assignment at St. Mary’s in Detroit. The parish continued to grow in size and spirit to the present day, and may it continue to do so!

Information is gratefully taken with permission from Of Pilgrimage, Prayer, and Promise, produced by the Westphalia Historical Society, Westphalia Area History, and from Sisters of Christian Charity revised edition 1999. Copies of Of Pilgrimage, Prayer, and Promise are available for purchase. Please contact the parish office to get a contact phone number for the Westphalia Historical Society.

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Allandale Mansion

Allandale is host to a rich history that intersects at key points in Kingsport history throughout the last century. But a lot can happen in that time, so we’ve broken it up into digestible points of interest for you. Explore this list of helpful links at your leisure and learn how Allandale came to be a key East Tennessee landmark.

Timashenko, landscape architect to President Dwight Eisenhower, designed and managed the details for the original Allandale grounds. Mr. Wassum [of Marion, Virginia], who also landscaped portions of the White House, was hired to arrange and plant the boxwoods and formal gardens. Allandale Mansion was planned around existing trees [which were by then centuries old], and additional large trees were imported by flat-bed truck and planted throughout the property.

Two large ponds were dug primarily to provide fire protection for the house, but also to beautify the grounds. Original plans also called for a substantial swimming pool complete with Grecian columns and statues.

In recent years, additional bedding plants [as well as dogwoods, magnolias, crepe myrtles, azaleas, boxwoods, and rhododendron] have been added to the back garden, and the Elise Brice Bourne formal rose garden was planted by her husband and friends to commemorate Mrs. Bourne’s dedicated service to the Friends of Allandale.

Most recently, Dr. Harry Coover and his family donated the “Heron Dome” in memory of his deceased wife, Mrs. Muriel Zumbach Coover. The “Dome” features a bronze heron sculpture in a shallow pool, surrounded by benches, landscaping, and lighting to make the structure suitable for evening events [such as weddings, parties, and social gatherings – or simply a quiet spot for reflection and enjoyment of nature’s beauty]. (Allandale) Captured by: TriReality

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East Side Freedom Library

The East Side Freedom Library (ESFL) has its home in the former Arlington Hills library, one of St. Paul’s historic Carnegie library buildings at 1105 Greenbrier Street, located in the Payne-Phalen neighborhood.

The ESFL’s mission is to inspire solidarity, advocate for justice and work toward equity for all.  The library houses non-circulating research collections that appeal to interested general learners as well as scholars, with innovative databases and finding aids that make using the collections fun and vital.

The story is a major theme of the ESFL, and the telling and gathering of stories, through formal interviews, workshops, and small-scale public performances, will allow local residents and the interested public to learn more about the work and residential histories of the East Side. Captured by: KJ Reynolds and Associates

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Waldmann Brewery & Wurstery

Waldmann Brewery & Wurstery first opened prior to the Civil War by Bavarian immigrant Anton Waldmann and his wife (Wilhel)Mina, Waldmann is the oldest surviving saloon building in the Twin Cities. Meticulously restored to its frontier grace and simplicity, Waldmann once again welcomes all with the warmth of its wood stoves, lamplight and traditionally-crafted house-made lagers, wursts and other honest fares. Waldmann is a humble, memorable place—full of stories and tradition that just may inspire you to make a few of your own. (Waldmann Brewery & Wurstery)

Captured by: Nienow Cultural Consultants LLC

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National Gallery of Art: Mark Rothko

National Gallery of Art: Mark Rothko (1903 – 1970)

Mark Rothko in his West 53rd Street studio, c. 1953, photograph by Henry Elkan, courtesy Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Rudi Blesh Papers

One of the preeminent artists of his generation, Mark Rothko is closely identified with the New York school, a circle of painters that emerged during the 1940s as a new collective voice in American art. During a career that spanned five decades, he created a new and impassioned form of abstract painting.

Rothko’s work is characterized by rigorous attention to formal elements such as color, shape, balance, depth, composition, and scale; yet, he refused to consider his paintings solely in these terms. He explained: “It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted. This is the essence of academicism. There is no such thing as good painting about nothing.” (National Gallery of Art)

Captured by:  Ashleigh Joplin/The Washington Post

Virginia Theatre

Owned and operated by the Champaign Park District since 2000, the Virginia Theatre is a historic performing arts center and movie palace that hosts concerts, stage plays, dance, spoken word, children’s events, films, comedy, private parties, corporate events, the Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, meetings and more. Since 1921, the 1463-seat Virginia has been a Champaign-Urbana landmark, offering entertainment first as a vaudeville house, legitimate theatre, and movie house. Now fully restored, the Virginia Theatre is ideally positioned to resume its role as a vibrant community center, active performance space, and bustling cinema!

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Art of the Automobile & Artworks by Amy Weeks

Art of the Automobile is proud to be an Artweek Massachusetts event. We are a unique educational motorsport event, showcased in the City of Boston that allows participants from Automotive collectors and enthusiasts of all levels to join in putting on a display for the general public. This spring’s event benefactor, the Martin Richard Foundation(TeamMR8.org), allows our Automotive community to ‘foster greater togetherness, compassion, peace and kindness in our communities through activities that build bridges and bring people together’. In particular, the funds raised by this event will go to organizing programming at Martin’s Park at the Smith Family Waterfront next to the Boston Children’s Museum.

Artwork by Maharishi University graduate Amy Weeks. Captured by: HistoryView.org

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Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History: Inside a T. rex

Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History: Inside a T. rex

Tyrannosaurus or T. rex is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex is one of the most well-represented of the large theropods. Wikipedia

Lived83.6 million years ago – 66 million years ago (Cretaceous)
Did you knowHumans are closer to the time of the T. Rex than T. Rex was to the time of the Stegosaurus. edp24.co.uk

Lillie Mansion at Lutheran Rehabilitation and Skilled Care Center

History and Tradition Restored

Named for one of the beloved Matrons in the mansion’s history, Sister Lillie Carlson, The Lillie Mansion will expand Lutheran Rehabilitation and Skilled Care Center’s continuum of care to welcome older adults who wish to maintain an independent lifestyle, while receiving the personal support services they need in a beautiful, historic setting. Captured by: InvelopBoston

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Bent County/Las Animas Cemetery

For more than 160 years, the current Bent County/Las Animas Cemetery has served as a community burial ground and the final resting place for several famous names in Colorado history.

One famous Coloradan who rests there is fur trader William Bent, who with his brother built and operated the famous Bent’s Fort. A replica of the 1840s adobe fort is now a National Historic Site.

The cemetery is also the burial site of Amache Prowers, an influential Cheyenne woman who married one of the men in the Prowers family. The Prowers were early Coloradans who settled near Boggsville, adjacent to the area that is now the cemetery. (Susan M. Thornton)

Captured by: Drone Bros, LLC

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Rensselaer Model Railroad Society

Rensselaer Model Railroad Society is the only student-directed community outreach project at Rensselaer Union.  The club constructions and operates an HO scale layout that recreates some 40 local scenes from Troy to the Canadian Border, all set in 1950.

We meet on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Friday evenings, 7-9 pm, Saturday afternoons, 1-3 pm.  Entrance is by the waterfalls behind the Commons.  If you ring the doorbell, it can take a long time for us to get upstairs so please be patient. We also host small groups (five or less) to see the layout in a short (5-10 min.) tour, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, noon-5 pm.

Captured by: Hudson Virtual Tours

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Roads and Rails Museum

Founded by David Burroughs, Roads & Rails Museum celebrates miniature railroads. The museum houses one of the largest miniature world model train displays in the country and is designed to be a fun display of three-dimensional art, combined with sound and movement.  It is a miniature world complete with a zoo, circus, working volcano, walk-through mountains, subway, coal mine, castle and towns with moving trains, trolleys, cars and trucks.  With a gift shop and much more!

Roads and Rails Museum is a great family-friendly experience that is fun for all ages.

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Caterpillar Visitor Center & Museum

The Caterpillar Visitor Center & Museum is a fascinating look at the company, the iron and the people making sustainable progress possible around the world. From the humble beginnings of the first tractor to the company’s present-day leadership in building infrastructure and powering the planet — it’s all right here on Peoria’s beautiful riverfront. We invite you to experience Caterpillar like never before and plan your visit today. Captured by: AerialMG

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Jim Crow Museum

The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State UniversityBig RapidsMichigan, displays a wide variety of everyday artifacts depicting the history of racist portrayals of African Americans in American popular culture. The mission of the Jim Crow Museum is to use objects of intolerance to teach tolerance and promote social justice.

The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia has a collection of over 10,000 objects, primarily created between the 1870s and the 1960s. It also includes contemporary objects.

The museum demonstrates how racist ideas and anti-black images were pervasive within American culture. It also shows how these images and ideas have resurfaced in recent years. Stories about African American achievements during the Jim Crow era, along with artifacts of the Civil Rights Movement, are also found within the museum. (Wikipedia) Captured by: Real Space

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Central Catholic High School – STEM Center

Step inside the new Zupancic Family STEM Center, a 30,000 square foot facility on the campus of Central Catholic High School in Pittsburgh, PA. This state-of-the-art building cost $12M and houses the school’s science, technology, engineering, and math courses. The four-story facility includes 12 classrooms, a tech shop, collaboratorium, robotics testing area, and build spaces. The integrated curriculum offered in the STEM program includes career-oriented electives like Intro to Programming, Data Analytics, Architecture, 3D Design, and Bio-Engineering.

(Matterport) Captured by: Kisker Productions

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Lemp Mansion

The Lemp Mansion (3322 DeMenil Place, St. Louis, Missouri) is a historical house in Benton ParkSt. Louis, Missouri. It is also the site of four suicides by Lemp family members after the death of the son Frederick Lemp, whose William J. Lemp Brewing Co. dominated the St. Louis beer market before Prohibition with its Falstaff beer brand. The mansion is said to be haunted by members of the Lemp family. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: InvelopNow

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Hotel Henry

3rd Floor

Buffalo’s Urban Resort

Hotel Henry Urban Resort Conference Center makes innovative new use of one of Western New York’s most iconic architectural landmarks. Widely considered to be one of Buffalo’s most important and beautiful buildings, construction on the 145-year-old Richardson Olmsted Campus began in 1872 and opened in 1880 as the state-of-the-art Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane. Henry Hobson Richardson, who is one of “The Recognized Trinity of American Architecture,” constructed this Richardson Romanesque-style campus of buildings more than 145 years ago alongside Dr. Thomas Story Kirkbride, developer of the Kirkbride Plan to improve medical care for mental health patients. America’s landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Central Park in New York City, as well as Buffalo’s beautiful park system, designed the grounds and gardens throughout the campus alongside Calvert Vaux.

The Richardson Olmsted Campus is recognized as a National Historic Landmark, a nationally significant historic place, designated by the Secretary of the Interior, possessing exceptional value or interpreting the nation’s heritage. For decades, countless citizens and constituencies have invested in saving these historically and culturally important structures. From individual grassroots preservationists to organized boards and New York State allocations, an immense collaborative effort led to the establishment of the Richardson Center Corporation. Since its formation, the Richardson Center Corporation has completed essential planning reports, stabilized the buildings, re-landscaped the South Lawn, and searched for new uses and leaseholders to help fund rehabilitation of the campus.

NEW LIFE AS AN ASSET FOR WESTERN NEW YORK

Now, with generous funding from CityInn Buffalo, LLC hospitality group, New York State, and historic tax credits, Hotel Henry Urban Resort Conference Center is proud to open a new chapter for the campus and surrounding neighborhoods. Hotel Henry Urban Resort Conference Center is proud to be the first phase and 1/3 of the redevelopment of the Richardson Olmsted Campus, bringing new life and meaning to the National Historic Landmark. As a successful first leaseholder within the Richardson Olmsted Campus, Hotel Henry is paving the way for more leasing interest and the rehabilitation of the rest of the campus.

(siteview) Captured by: AVAR

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Traverse County Museum

Located in former Milwaukee Railroad Depot. Featuring old kitchen/living room/bedroom/sewing room exhibits. Old farm machinery display. General store/bank/post office/jewelry store/produce/butcher shop/blacksmith shop/doctor& dentist offices/dress shop/newspaper office and church exhibits. The restored one-room school, railroad caboose, old fire truck and car display. Many other antique/vintage items as well. (Explore Minnesota)

Captured by: Neinow Cultural Consultants

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Timberline Lodge at Mount Hood

Captured by: ToPa 3D

Explore a unique piece of American history: Timberline Lodge. The iconic lodge sits at an elevation of nearly 6,000 feet in the Mount Hood National Forest in Oregon. Built in 1937, Timberline Lodge was created as an initiative by President Franklin Roosevelt to stimulate the struggling economy and give jobs to thousands of unemployed citizens during the Great Depression. Most of the construction was done by hand and was completed in only 15 months! Walk around this mountain retreat that helped trigger the skiing industry in Oregon! (Matterport)

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Fearless Girl versus Charging Bull

Fearless Girl is a bronze sculpture by Kristen Visbal, commissioned by State Street Global Advisors via McCann New York, depicting a Latina girl facing the Charging Bull statue. Wikipedia

Charging Bull, which is sometimes referred to as the Wall Street Bull or the Bowling Green Bull, is a bronze sculpture that stands in Bowling Green in the Financial District in Manhattan, New York City. Wikipedia

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Lake Arrowhead Queen Tour Boat

Nestled in the magnificent San Bernardino National Forest, surrounded by pine, cedar, and dogwood, at an altitude of 5100′, an area described as the “Alps of Southern California”, and known as “the best kept secret on the West Coast, is a stunningly beautiful, cozy and quaint mountain resort paradise called Lake Arrowhead. Our community features countless outdoor recreational activities such as hiking, backpacking, camping, bicycling, lake tours, water and snow skiing, ice skating, fishing, horseback riding, and much more. With the stunning scenery and wildlife, comes a natural peacefulness that has lured people to these mountains for centuries. (Lake Arrowhead Queen) Captured by: ReOrbitVR

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Booth Western Art Museum

Open since 2003, the Booth Museum houses the largest permanent exhibition space for Western art in the country, and it is the second largest art museum in Georgia. In this model, visit the lobby and American West galleries, where you will see iconic views, an entire stagecoach, and works by premier Western artists including George Catlin, Charles M. Russell, and Frederic Remington. The Booth Museum also houses collections of Native American, Civil War, and Presidential art. (Matterport) Captured by: Real Tour

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Buffalo Botanical Gardens

The Buffalo and Erie County Botanical Gardens are botanical gardens located within South Park in Buffalo, New York, United States. These gardens are the product of landscaping architect Frederick Law Olmsted, glass-house architects Lord & Burnham, and botanist and plant-explorer John F. Cowell. (Wikipedia)

The Buffalo Botanical Gardens in Buffalo, NY was designed by Frederick Olmsted who famously designed Central Park in New York City. Certain elements of the garden, such as the tri-domed glass, were designed by Lord and Burnham who designed the Crystal Palace in England. The Buffalo Botanical Garden was built between 1897-1899. The structure is actually part of the city’s South Park. Today, there are 23 employees and over 250 active volunteers maintaining the Botanical Gardens for over 100,000 annual visitors. (Matterport) Captured by: VRealExperience

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Diefenbunker

Kingsport Tennessee’s LampLight Theatre: A Midwinter’s Carol

A Midwinter’s Carol is a Christmas musical presented in traditional Victorian fashion. Inspired by Little Peter: A Christmas Morality for Children of Any Age written in 1888, this musical production is was presented at Kingsport Tennessee’s LampLight Theatre in December 2017. Explore the theatre as it was transformed for the Victorian-themed musical. (Matterport) Captured by: samiamedia

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Yosemite National Park

Not just a great valley, but a shrine to human foresight, the strength of granite, the power of glaciers, the persistence of life, and the tranquillity of the High Sierra.

First protected in 1864, Yosemite National Park is best known for its waterfalls, but within its nearly 1,200 square miles, you can find deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, a vast wilderness area, and much more. (US National Park Service)

Captured by: Capture It 3D

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ʻIolani Palace

The ʻIolani Palace was the royal residence of the rulers of the Kingdom of Hawaii beginning with Kamehameha III under the Kamehameha Dynasty and ending with Queen Liliʻuokalani under the Kalākaua Dynasty, founded by her brother, King David Kalākaua. Iolani Palace is the last residence of the Hawaiian monarchy and the only royal palace in the US. (Wikipedia)

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Henry Ford Museum: Rosa Parks Bus

On Dec. 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on this bus and was arrested for violating segregation law. Her arrest sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which lasted for 381 days until segregation on public buses was repealed. Parks’ stance and the boycott were important events that raised awareness for the civil rights movement. Today, the bus is preserved at the Henry Ford Museum. In this model, board the bus and take Parks’ seat in the third row on the left. (Matterport)

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The Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS)

The Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) is a prototype of a habitat for humans to experiment and see what it would be like to work and live on Mars. The station simulates the type of environment that would serve as the main base for months of exploration in the harsh Martian environment. The MDRS hosts scientists, engineers, and sometimes college students in relative isolation for 2-3 weeks to research technology, operations, and science associated with human space exploration. The two-story cylindrical building, dubbed the “Hab”, was built in 2001 and can house seven crew members at any time.

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ClubCorp Holdings – Metropolitan Club

ClubCorp (NASDAQ: MYCC) is an American corporation with a home office in Dallas and is the largest owner and operator of private golf and country clubs in the country. It owns or operates more than 200 golf and country clubs and business, sports and alumni clubs worldwide.


Located in 26 states, the District of Columbia and two foreign countries, the company and the clubs in its network services more than 430,000 members and employ approximately 20,000 peak-season employees.

The Willis Tower, built as and still commonly referred to as the Sears Tower, is a 110-story, 1,450-foot skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Wikipedia Captured by: 360° 3D World

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Helen’s Rain Garden

rain garden is a planted depression or a hole that allows rainwater runoff from impervious urban areas, like roofs, driveways, walkways, parking lots, and compacted lawn areas, the opportunity to be absorbed. This reduces rain runoff by allowing stormwater to soak into the ground (as opposed to flowing into storm drains and surface waters which causes erosionwater pollutionflooding, and diminished groundwater). They should be designed for specific soils and climates. The purpose of a rain garden is to improve water quality in nearby bodies of water and to ensure that rainwater becomes available for plants as groundwater rather than being sent through stormwater drains straight out to sea. Rain gardens can cut down on the amount of pollution reaching creeks and streams by up to 30%. (Wikipedia) Captured by: 360° 3D World

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Springfield Junior High School

Springfield School serves approximately 400 pre-kindergarten through sixth-grade students.  Our school community focuses on providing a safe and nurturing environment that encourages life-long learning while providing a challenging education.  Students are guided to develop positive social skills to encourage their growth as productive and responsible citizens.  The teachers at Springfield are dedicated professionals who work hard to ensure a positive and supportive environment for every student.  We strive to develop a partnership with our families to ensure the best education for our students.

Dr. Adam Thorns, Principal

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Jefferson Memorial

Author of the Declaration of Independence, Statesman and Visionary for the founding of a Nation. Read More · Statue being lifted into place. History of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial. Bronze Statue being lifted into place within the Memorial Chamber. Last updated: July 11, 2016. National Mall and Memorial Parks. (National Park Service)

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Burton Historical Collection

The Burton Historical Collection (BHC) of the Detroit Public Library began as the private library of Clarence Monroe Burton. In addition to being a prominent attorney, Mr. Burton was a Detroit historiographer and the founder of the C. M. Burton Abstract Co. Mr. Burton’s original intention was to assemble a collection on the history of Detroit. Realizing that Detroit’s history was inextricably connected to that of Michigan and the Old Northwest and those histories to that of Canada and New France, he assembled a collection that was one of the most important private historical collections in the country.

Over the course of 40 years, Mr. Burton systematically collected original documents and personal papers of prominent citizens of Detroit and Michigan. By 1914 the library contained 30,000 volumes, 40,000 pamphlets and 500,000 unpublished papers. Mr. Burton donated his collection, including the building it was housed in, to the Detroit Public Library in 1915. The collection was moved to the new main library in 1921.

The BHC is both a repository of records of the past and a workshop of historical activity in the present, with emphasis on the history of Detroit and Michigan from the time of settlement in the 17th century to the present.

The background history encompasses the Great Lakes area, New England, and New France as well as local and county histories for both the United States and Canada. Noted for its source material, the BHC contains books, pamphlets, bound newspapers, atlases, maps, pictures, photographs, personal papers, archives, business records, and ephemeral items such newspaper clippings, broadsides, and scrapbooks.

Genealogical materials in the BHC include federal census population schedules, family histories, cemetery inscriptions, church records of baptisms, marriages, and deaths, military records, hereditary society indexes, heraldry books, immigration records, probate indexes and records, vital records, obituaries, and land records.

The Map Collection holds materials from around the world dating from the 16th through the 20th centuries with a particular emphasis on Detroit and Michigan. The collection includes maps, atlases, Sanborn fire insurance maps, gazetteers and geographical dictionaries.

Over 4,000 manuscript collections, consisting of personal papers, records of organizations, businesses and churches, and the governmental archives of Detroit and Wayne County, Michigan make up the manuscript collection. Of particular interest are: the Grace Bedell letter to Abraham Lincoln; French licenses to voyageurs; correspondence and papers of local notables such as Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, Anthony Wayne, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft and Lewis Cass. (Burton Historical Collection) Captured by: Detroit Free Press

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