Genève Enchères Auction House

Genève Enchères is an auction house located in Geneva, Switzerland. Genève Enchère has a vast collection of sophisticated and fine-art pieces available for auction, ranging from delicate, fine china plates to highly prized paintings. (Matterport)

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Narvik War Museum

The Narvik War Museum in Narvik, Norway is a museum reflecting on Narvik’s history throughout World War II. The exhibition begins its story with Germany’s initial attack on Narvik and Norway in April 1940. The exhibition looks at various war themes including conflict and human rights. Attendees are able to experience the exhibit is not only Norwegian, but also English, French, Polish, and German. (Matterport)

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Acorn Theatre, Penzance

In 1969 the former Wesleyan Methodist chapel was bought by Gay Sagar-Fenton who donated it to a local charity, Penzance Arts Centre, to enable them to run it as a theatre.  In 1987 the trustees of Cornwall Theatre Company Ltd., a small scale touring theatre company, took over the assets and liabilities of the Penzance Arts Centre. Their aim was to increase and expand the audiences by injecting a new enthusiasm for the arts into the community and widening the spectrum of arts provided.

In June 1996 the Acorn Arts Centre was awarded a significant grant from the National Lottery to undertake essential refurbishment of its premises and re-design the internal layout including improved access. Building works were completed in 1998 and the Acorn Arts Centre re-opened as a flexible venue with a 170-seat main theatre and a smaller basement bar/theatre with an 80 seat capacity.

After a brief period of closure in 2010, The Acorn Theatre has come back to life and once more occupies a vital place in the community as the main centre for music, theatre, dance and other live arts in West Cornwall. (The Acorn) Captured by: Perran3D

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Saint Piran & Saint Michael Church

The Saint Piran & Saint Michael Church is one of three in Cornwall dedicated to St. Piran. Piran, reputedly a son of Ireland, may actually have come from Perranzabuloe in Cornwall, the main cult center with another ‘Piran’ church being established at Perranarworthal. Perranuthnoe church is first mentioned in 1348, though its first rector is named in 1277.

 

The church acquired an additional patron saint – St Nicholas – in 1856, today replaced by St. Michael. A 1980 painting of the legends of St Piran by local artist Rosemary Ziar and modern sculpture of St Piran created by Annie HenryHolland and dedicated by Bishop Bill Ind in 2008 can be found in St Nicholas chapel in the south transept. (Saint Piran & Saint Michael Church)

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Molen de Hoop

Molen de Hoop windmill, which was originally built in 1752, is found in the small village of Loenen aan de Vecht in the Netherlands. In 1725, it was estimated that there were about 1,100 windmills in the Netherlands. By the 19th century, that count increased to about 10,000 windmills. Windmills like this one were used to pump the rain and water from the big rivers out to sea. Other similar windmills were used for industrial purposes like graining wheat as well. Translated to English, this particular windmill’s name is “Windhill of Hope.” (Matterport)

CAptured by: PR3D.EU

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The National Gallery: Sainsbury Wing

In 1985 Lord Sainsbury of Preston Candover and his brothers The Hon. Simon Sainsbury and Sir Timothy Sainsbury generously agreed to finance the construction of a new wing for the Gallery.

A site next to the Gallery had been vacant since the Second World War when a furniture shop was destroyed by bombing. The new Sainsbury Wing was opened in 1991, to display the entire early Renaissance collection.

This followed on from the Northern Extension, which opened in 1975, providing considerable extra exhibition space: nine large rooms and three smaller ‘cabinet’ rooms. These new galleries made use of natural lighting as far as possible.

The Sainsbury Wing was added to the National Heritage List for England (Grade 1) in 2018.

Following the completion of the Sainsbury Wing, the Gallery has a total floor area of 46,396 metres squared – equivalent to around six football pitches. It would be big enough to hold over 2,000 London double-decker buses. (The National Gallery)

The Sainsbury Wing was built to house the National Gallery’s world-class collection of Early Renaissance paintings. Comprising 16 rooms displaying over 270 works from 1200 to 1500, it first opened to the public in July 1991.

Take a virtual tour of the collection and immerse yourself in spellbinding works of art, including ‘The Wilton Diptych’, van Eyck’s ‘Arnolfini Portrait’, Botticelli’s ‘Venus and Mars’ and Leonardo’s ‘Virgin of the Rocks’.

Please note that some paintings are not available as part of the tour; other paintings shown in the tour may not be on physical display in the Gallery. (Matterport)

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Charles Dickens Museum

The Charles Dickens Museum is an author’s house museum at 48 Doughty Street in Holborn, London Borough of Camden. It occupies a typical Georgian terraced house which was Charles Dickens’s home from 25 March 1837 to December 1839. (Wikipedia)

Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. (Wikipedia)

 

Captured by: 3Dscann

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Penlee Lifeboat

RNLB ON-1265 Ivan Ellen – Severn Class

The Severn has a sheerline that sweeps down for ease of survivor recovery. The Penlee Lifeboat is inherently self-righting and should it be knocked over in extreme weather, it will automatically right itself within a few seconds. Her propellers and rudders lie in partial tunnels set into the hull that, along with the two bilge keels, provide excellent protection from damage in shallow water. In addition to her twin engines, the Severn is fitted with a hydraulic-powered bow thruster for improved maneuverability. The comprehensive electronics include VHF and MF radios with DSC functionality, VHF direction finder, DGPS with electronic chart system and radar. The Severn carries a small Y boat, which is an inflatable daughter boat complete with a 15hp outboard engine. This small craft can be launched with a crane and is used in moderate conditions to access areas where the lifeboat cannot reach. Comprehensive first aid equipment includes stretchers, oxygen, and Entonox. Other equipment includes a portable salvage pump carried in a watertight container. The last Severn class lifeboat was built in 2004. The lifeboats undergo a regular condition-based maintenance regime to check their condition.

Date introduced:  1995

On station:  March 2003

ON: 1265

Launch type:  Afloat

Number in fleet:  35 at stations plus 9 in the relief fleet

Last built: 2004

Crew: Nominal 7

Length:  17.3m

Beam/width:  5.9m

Draught/depth:  1.78m

Displacement: 42 tonnes

Max speed:  25 knots

Fuel capacity:  5,600 litres

Operating range/endurance:  250 nautical miles

Construction:
Hull:
 fiber-reinforced composite with single-skin section below the chine and 100mm thick foam-cored sandwich
Above deck and superstructure: 25mm foam-cored sandwich

Engines:  2 x Caterpillar 3412 TA marine diesel; 1,250hp each at 2,300rpm

Survivor capacity:  Self-righting – 28 – Non-self-righting – 124

Funded by: Mr Harold Ivan Leach

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HMS Belfast | Imperial War Museums

The HMS Belfast was originally a light cruiser vessel built for the United Kingdom’s Royal Navy. Commissioned in 1939 shortly before World War II, the HMS Belfast was used in the Royal Navy’s war efforts including a naval blockade against Germany, escort missions for the Soviet Union, and the Battle of North Cape. During World War II, the HMS Belfast also supported the Normandy landings. Today, the ship permanently sits along the River Thames in London, UK as a museum. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Lime Venue Portfolio

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Shoes Or No Shoes Museum

Almost every human being owns a pair in one or another execution. On the one hand, this universal object leads a visitor of SONS through all ethnic cultures and peoples, from the first foot-covered footsteps of humans till today. On the other hand through the world of modern art, highlighted out of a surprising perspective.

Thanks to Dirk Vanderschueren, the museum’s owner, these two unique collections have found a home in a building of amazing architecture in beautiful surroundings. The whole results in a place of direct confrontation, a happening with international allure. (Shoes or No Shoes Museum)

Captured by: VR Media

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Air Ambulance Eurocopter EC135

The Eurocopter EC135 (now Airbus Helicopters H135) is a twin-engine civil light utility helicopter produced by Airbus Helicopters (formerly known as Eurocopter). It is capable of flight under instrument flight rules (IFR) and is outfitted with digital flight controls. It entered service in 1996; over a thousand aircraft have been produced to date. It is widely used by police and ambulance services and for executive transport; by 2013, more than 500 EC135s were providing helicopter emergency medical services across the world. While the EC135 is primarily used by civil operators, a combat-capable military-orientated variant of the EC135, designated as the Eurocopter EC635, has also been produced. (Wikipedia)

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Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery

Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery (BM&AG) is a museum and art gallery in Birmingham, England. It has a collection of international importance covering fine art, ceramics, metalwork, jewellery, natural history, archaeology, ethnography, local history and industrial history. The museum/gallery is run by Birmingham Museums Trust, the largest independent museums trust in the United Kingdom, which also runs eight other museums around the city. Entrance to the Museum and Art Gallery is free, but some major exhibitions in the Gas Hall incur an entrance fee. (Wikipedia)

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Churchill War Rooms

The Churchill War Rooms in London is a museum located inside the British government’s former underground command center during World War II. The museum is dedicated to the life and legacy of Winston Churchill who served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. Churchill’s speeches and radio broadcasts during the war are considered to be some of the most influential and inspirational speeches of any world leader ever known. (Matterport)

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Fallero Museum of Valencia

The Fallero Museum of Valencia is installed, since 1971, in the old convent of the mission house of San Vicente de Paül, which was finished in 1831, which is why it retains part of a structure of corridors and old cells. Subsequently had multiple uses, such as prison, barracks or warehouse. The Fallero Museum was rehabilitated and restructured in the early nineties of the twentieth century, being reopened in 1995. In 2016 the Fallero Museum was approved as the official Museum of the Valencian Government, being restructured again in its museological and museographic approaches. One of the novelties of this restructuring was the start-up of the temporary exhibition hall “Josep Alarte”, dedicated to anthological exhibitions of the work of Fallas artists. (Wikipedia)

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Museum of Cornish Life

Captured by: Ocean3D

Museum of Cornish Life is a museum situated in the former market town of Helston, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom.

The museum is housed in Helston’s former Market House and Drill Hall. The museum was founded in 1949, the building was originally designed as the town’s Market House in 1837.

4th Battalion, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry (D Company) used it as their drill hall during World War 1.

The Museum expanded into the meat market in the early 1980s and into the adjoining Drill Hall in 1999. A suspended gallery was also added at this time that in turn allowed the creation of the mezzanine art gallery.

In front of the building is a cannon salvaged from the wreck of the frigate HMS Anson which foundered off Loe Bar on 29 December 1807.

The Museum’s collection reflects both the social and industrial history of The Lizard Peninsula, from mining, fishing, and farming through to home life in the 18th – 20th centuries.

Previously run by Cornwall Council, management of the museum was taken over by the South Kerrier Heritage Trust in August 2013. The Trust is a local registered charity working with the community, and day-to-day work at the museum is largely undertaken by volunteers. (Wikipedia)

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Royal Air Force Vulcan Bomber

The Avro Vulcan (later Hawker Siddeley Vulcan from July 1963) is a jet-powered tailless delta wing high-altitude strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A.V. Roe and Company (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the most technically advanced and hence the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles.

The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War between the United Kingdom and Argentina in 1982.

The Vulcan had no defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. Electronic countermeasures were employed by the B.1 (designated B.1A) and B.2 from circa 1960. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid-1970s nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refueling.

After retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named “The Spirit of Great Britain” was restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426, and XM655, have been kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. B.2 XH558 flew for the last time in October 2015, before also being kept in taxiable condition at Doncaster Sheffield Airport. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Miru 3D

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Küçüksu Palace

The Küçüksu Palace was commissioned by Sultan Abd-ul-Mejid I (1823–1861) and designed by the architects Garabet Amira Balyan and his son Nigoğayos Balyan in the neo-baroque style. Completed in 1857, the structure took the place of a two-story timber palace built during the reign of Mahmud I (1696–1754) by his Grand Vizier Divittar Mehmed Pasha, then successively used by Selim III (1761–1808) and Mahmud II (1785–1839).

The building consists of two main stories and a basement on a footprint of 15 x 27 m. Unlike other palace gardens with high walls; its garden is surrounded by cast-iron railings with one gate at each of the four sides. The basement was appointed with kitchen, larder, and servant’s quarters, with the floors above reflecting the design of a traditional Turkish house – four corner rooms surrounding a central hall. The rooms at the waterfront have two fireplaces while the others have one each, all fashioned from colorful Italian marble. The rooms boast crystal chandeliers from Bohemia, with curtains, furniture upholstery, and carpets woven in Hereke. The halls and the rooms exhibit paintings and art objects; Sechan, stage designer at Vienna State Opera, was charged for the decoration of the interior.

During the reign of Sultan Abd-ul-Aziz (1830–1876), more elaborate decoration was added to the façade; some of the original garden outbuildings were demolished at that time. At the beginning of the Republican era, the site was used as a state guesthouse for some years. Since a thorough restoration in 1944, the palace has been open to the public as a museum.

The palace appeared in the James Bond film “The World Is Not Enough” as the mansion of a woman in Baku. The palace also appeared in popular Bollywood film Ek Tha Tiger. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Metaroma

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Sarajevo, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Sarajevo, capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina, is a compact city on the Miljacka River, surrounded by the Dinaric Alps. Its center has museums commemorating local history, including Sarajevo 1878–1918, which covers the 1914 assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, an event that sparked World War I. Landmarks of the old quarter, Baščaršija, include the Ottoman-era Gazi Husrev-bey Mosque. (Wikipedia)

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Submarine Lembit

EML Lembit is one of two Kalev-class mine-laying submarines built for the Republic of Estonia before World War II and is now a museum ship at Seaplane Harbour in Tallinn. She was launched in 1936 at Vickers and Armstrongs Ltd., Barrow-in-Furness in England, and served in the Estonian Navy and the Soviet Navy. Until she was hauled out on 21 May 2011, Lembit was the oldest submarine still afloat in the world. Her sister ship, Kalev, was sunk in October 1941. 

Lembit is the only surviving warship of the pre-war Estonian Navy and in the Baltic countries. Estonia is a maritime nation, and like every country with a long coastline to defend, it has to safeguard its territorial waters. With regard to experience gained and observed during World War I, submarines found their proper application in the pre–World War II Estonian Navy. The collection organized by the Submarine Fleet Foundation in May 1933 developed into one of the most successful undertakings among similar fundraising events nationwide.

In the course of building and testing the two submarines, the Estonian crews received training in Great Britain between 1935-1937. Throughout 1937–1940, Lembit and her sister ship Kalev were the most imposing vessels in the Estonian Navy. Their inactivity in the annexation of Estonia by the USSR was a political decision. (Wikipedia)

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Zair Azgur Memorial Museum & Workshop

Here’s yet another “classical” museum with plenty of Soviet artifacts. One of Belarus’ most famous sculptors, Zair Azgur authored many sculptures in Minsk, including Lenin’s monument and statues of poet Jakub Kolas and his literary heroes. Housed inside the sculptor’s former workshop, the museum allows you to feel as a Lilliput in the country of Soviet-made Gullivers. If you are lucky, you can also get some alternative culture experience. The museum’s management is open to creative ideas and cultural initiatives that are allowed to organize events here. Just imagine: a hall with giant sculptures along the walls turns into a stage for Belarus poetry evenings, indie music concerts and art performances. (ctv.by)

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Hotel d’Agar

Created by: Waldorf Productions

The Agar Hotel: a summary of the history of Cavaillon

p1010496.jpg

In the heart of Cavaillon, the Hotel d’Agar is built, like the nearby Saint-Véran cathedral, on the ruins of the Roman city that had developed at the bottom of the Saint Jacques hill. The first elements of what will be the Agar Hotel date from the 12th century. The hotel has been somewhat overhauled over the centuries, sometimes even abused. The vast house represents a summary of the history of the city, from the Gallo-Roman city to the agglomeration of the 21st century.

From Gothic to eighteenth

p1010058-1.jpgThis building belonged until 1640 to a large local family, the Hagar, who took an active part in the wars of religion, on the Catholic side. Jean d’Agar, Councilor in the Parliament of Aix, is an ardent “ligueur”. The family, installed in the seventeenth century in another hotel, in the Grand Rue, disappears from the city under the Revolution. She had meanwhile linked to other noble families in the region, the Agoult, Bus, Ciceri, Athenosi, Perussis …). This is one of the elements of the agar coat of arms that has been chosen as the “logo” of the house. Or rather houses, since their owners, Christian Morand and Véronique Valton, have recently acquired the second hotel in Agar, that of the Grand Rue de Cavaillon.

As it appears today, the Hotel d’Agar includes many remarkable elements: octagonal Gothic tower with its spiral staircase and its gargoyles, rooms sixteenth and seventeenth adorned with painted ceilings -can be at the occasion of the visit of François Ier in the city in 1537- and chimneys with decorations of gypsums, small Louis XIV facade overlooking the place Cabassole …

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A remarkable garden

In addition, the hotel has a wonderful garden, rich with many treasures, one of the few intra muros of Cavaillon. And one of the oldest since there are traces of garden for at least two millennia. Archaeologists are therefore at the party: remains of a Hellenistic temple with painted coatings, a temple of Mithra and, especially, the famous “treasure of Cavaillon”, more than 300 silver deniers in perfect condition. This treasure was discovered in 2010 and is the most important discovery in the Vaucluse.

The garden also contains a Roman aqueduct and irrigation channels dug after 1535. Not to mention the treasures accumulated by the owners …

 

 

The work of two collectors

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The set was bought in poor condition, in the 90s, by a couple of doctors, Christian Morand and Véronique Valton, who undertook a patient work of clearing and restoration. Work rewarded in 2011 by the inscription of the site (garden and building) to the Historical Monuments. But Christian and Véronique are also passionate collectors of traditional and contemporary art, and their home today has an impressive artistic and ethnographic treasure that they seek to share.

Sharing with the public

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Christian Morand and Véronique Valton are anything but selfish collectors: on the contrary, they want to create an interest in art and history through their house, the Hôtel d’Agar. It is therefore regularly open to the public, for the Heritage Days, the Gardens, or for exhibitions such as Christmas cribs and balls or relics. But they are also lovers of contemporary art and like to confront old and modern in their home.

The fieldwork is completed by the publication of books on collections and excavations by the editions of the Hotel d’Agar.

Eventually, they seek to be able to open the Hotel regularly and widely to the public. In 2011, already more than 15,000 people were able to push the doors of the Agar Hotel.

Read more at http://www.hotel-dagar.com/pages/l.html#QoUAdb31ChFP0A6i.99

Kvarven Fort

Created by: Showcase3D.no

Kvarven Fort was a mountain fort strategically located by the main shipping channel of the Byfjorden leading to Bergen, Norway.

Christie’s 20th Century Week

Created by: Christie’s

20th Century Week brings together a breathtaking array of Impressionist and modern art across six auctions in London this June, ranging from masterpieces by Monet and Malevich and monumental British sculpture to works on paper and Picasso ceramics.

The Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale is headlined by Picasso’s rarely exhibited Femme dans un fauteuil, an arresting portrait from 1942 of his great muse of the period, Dora Maar, alongside Monet’s Le Gare Saint-Lazare, vue extérieure, one of 12 paintings from the artist’s seminal series depicting the bustling life of the Parisian station. Other highlights range from an important Malevich landscape to vibrant studies by Chagall, Matisse, and Miró. The Evening Sale is complemented by captivating works in the Day Sale by Klee, Matisse, Ernst, and Serusier, amongst others.

The exceptional sculpture on offer in the Modern British Art Evening Sale will be showcased in our annual Sculpture in the Square exhibition, featuring works by Barry Flanagan, William Turnbull, Elisabeth Frink and more. Alongside this, the Evening and Day auctions will offer superb paintings by the likes of Edward Burra, C.R.W. Nevinson, Pauline Boty, Frank Auerbach, Ben Nicholson, David Hockney and L.S. Lowry.

Sigmund Freud Museum

Captured by: UK360VR

The Freud Museum in London is a museum dedicated to Sigmund Freud, located in the house where Freud lived with his family during the last year of his life. (Wikipedia)

Wampanoag Homesite Wetu

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Pilgrim Villager House

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Wooden Church: Assumption of the Virgin Mary

Created by: 3D Tour

Biserica Adormirii Maicii Domnului is the oldest wooden church in the country, built from Calarasi Moldovan woodland oak trees. The church was founded by the freeholders of Hiriseni in 1642 in the courtyard of another monastery, Harjauca.

In 1821, when the monastery moved, the church was transferred on the territory of Hiriseni village, Telenesti, where it served the inhabitants until 1928 when a stone church was built. Afterwards, the church was forgotten and abandoned, transformed into a cemetery chapel. But the wooden church managed to survive, except for the roof and the steeple which succumbed to their age. Finally, in 2010, the church was dismantled and reassembled in Chisinau. It is the only wooden church in Moldova that keeps its classical medieval Moldovan architecture. It is the tallest wooden church in the country and contains about 85% of the original church beams. The iconostasis was also largely preserved, with stately icons dating back to the XVIII century.

Chisinau bd. Dacia, immediate outside city limits, on the territory of Village Museum

GSM: (+373) (0)60 069 707

Email: bisericamedievala@yahoo.com (Moldova)

Castle Van Male

Captured by: VR Media

Male Castle (DutchKasteel van Male) is a former castle in Male, once a separate village, now part of Sint-Kruis, a suburb of BrugesWest FlandersBelgium. The buildings, almost entirely rebuilt and restored after the destruction of World War II, have housed St. Trudo’s Abbey (Sint-Trudoabdij) since 1954.

The castle’s origins date back to the 9th century, as a defensive tower for protection of the territory around Bruges against the Vikings. Male was held by Philip of Alsace, Count of Flanders, between 1168 and 1191, who replaced the wooden structure with one built of stone, which included a chapel consecrated by the exiled archbishop of CanterburyThomas Becket, in 1166.

The castle was a residence of the Counts of Flanders (in 1329 it was the birthplace of Count Louis II, sometimes known as Louis of Male) but was also a stronghold in a much-disputed terrain. French forces occupied it. The city of Bruges retook it from its French garrison in the uprising of 1302. Soldiers from Ghent razed it in 1382 and after it had been rebuilt, ransacked it again in 1453. In 1473 it was burnt out and once again rebuilt: the present keep dates from that rebuilding and stands with its foundations directly in the moat, now flanked by symmetrical wings. The castle was plundered yet again in 1490 by the forces of the Count of Nassau.

When Flanders became a part of the Burgundian Netherlands Male retained its importance. During the Spanish occupation of the Low Countries, the citadel was sold in 1558 by Philip II to Juan Lopez Gallo.

It was occupied by German troops in both world wars and was severely damaged.

This mighty castle is now the property of the family Deprez. (Wikipedia)