Boeing CH-47D Chinook “My Old Lady”

My Old Lady was was built in 1962, and on Jan. 9, 1963 it became the fifth Chinook accepted by the U.S. Army (91-00261). The twin-engined helo accommodates a crew of 2-3 and up to 50 troops. It has served with the U. S. Army and Army National Guard, and based at Camp Murray near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington since 2009. The aircraft flew combat missions in Iraq, Kuwait and Afghanistan during 2009-2011. Locally it was flown in support of domestic emergencies, most recently the Okanogan Complex Wildfire in 2015. It is the only authorized U.S. Army aircraft with nose art. My Old Ladywas the oldest flyable Chinook in the world-wide Army inventory when it was taken off of flight status in 2017 after 54 years of service.

CH-47 models entered combat service in 1965 during the Vietnam War. The Chinooks were vital to many aspects of the war including troop transport, placing artillery batteries in mountain positions inaccessible by other means, and recovering downed aircraft. Chinooks retrieved 11,500 disabled aircraft, worth over 3 billion U.S. dollars throughout the conflict. (Museum of Flight)(Museum of Flight)

USS Croaker

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USS Croaker

SS-246 is on the National Register of Historic Places and represents the Navy’s “silent service”. One of 77 Gato class submarines constructed, she was part of the most lethal submarine class of WWII. Commissioned in 1944, she celebrated her 75th birthday in 2019. Conducting six war patrols in the pacific theater, she sank 11 Japanese vessels, four of which were capital or military vessels, and seven auxiliary or support vessels.

She is not in her original WWII Configuration, as after WWII she was converted to a “hunter-killer” submarine with added sonar, radar and quieting capabilities to combat the Russian threat during the Cold War. She was decommissioned in 1971 and brought to the Buffalo Naval Park in 1988. Head below to see what it was like to be part of the 80-man crew.

SS-246

Length: 311 feet
Beam: 27 feet
Draft: 17 feet
Displacement: 1,525 tons
Armament: Eight Mk-44 torpedo tubes
Complement: 81 Sailors

Warwick Castle

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Warwick Castle is a medieval castle developed from a wooden fort, originally built by William the Conqueror during 1068. Warwick is the county town of Warwickshire, England, situated on a bend of the River Avon. The original wooden motte-and-bailey castle was rebuilt in stone during the 12th century. During the Hundred Years War, the facade opposite the town was refortified, resulting in one of the most recognisable examples of 14th-century military architecture. It was used as a stronghold until the early 17th century, when it was granted to Sir Fulke Greville by James I in 1604. Greville converted it to a country house and it was owned by the Greville family, who became Earls of Warwick in 1759, until 1978 when it was bought by the Tussauds Group. In 2007, the Tussauds Group was purchased by The Blackstone Group which merged it with Merlin Entertainments; Warwick Castle was then sold to Nick Leslau’s investment firm Prestbury Group under a sale and leaseback agreement.(Wikipedia)

Shobak “Montreal” Castle

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Montréal is a Crusader castle on the eastern side of the Arabah, perched on the side of a rocky, conical mountain, looking out over fruit trees below. The ruins, called Shoubak, are located in modern town of Shoubak in Jordan (Wikipedia)

Colonial National Historical Park: Yorktown Battlefield – Redoubt 9

Colonial National Historical Park is located in the Hampton Roads region of Virginia and is operated by the National Park Service of the United States government. The park protects and interprets several sites relating to the Colony of Virginia and the history of the United States more broadly, ranging from the site of the first landing of the English settlers who would settle at Jamestown, to the battlefields of Yorktown where the British Army was finally defeated in the American Revolutionary War. Over 3 million people visit the park each year.(Wikipedia)

Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima

Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, with the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement. The two bombings killed between 129,000 and 226,000 people, most of whom were civilians, and remain the first and only uses of nuclear weapons in armed conflict.(Wikipedia)

American Revolution

“On the afternoon of April 19, 1775. the first day of the American Revolution is unfolding.” Two hundred and forty-one years after the original battle, scores of professional reenactors, organizers, onlookers and photographers gather at Lexington and Concord and Minute Man National Historical Park to honor the memory of this critical turning point in American history.

Bunker WN-62

Almost at the very eastern end of Omaha beach, just below the American Cemetery is Wn62 a German strong point. These strong points were located all along the Atlantic Wall as a first line of defense against an attack by the Allies. No two strong points were the same, each one being designed for the location and also with what equipment was available.
WN62 had as its major armament two 75 mm cannon housed in H669 casemates. These are bizarre as it would seem that the camouflage  is on the interior of the casemate and not the outside. One of the guns had been moved away from the site by D-day.
They were aimed along the beach to the west and had large concrete walls protruding to the seaward side at the front to protect then from an attack directly from the front.
Although the Germans manning the guns were billeted in the village a house nearby was used to feed the troops and allowed them to rest whilst on guard here.
There were two small bunkers used to house ammunition .
Two larger bunkers, served to house ammunition, and in times of bombardments
personnel, which the nearer D-day approached the more bombardments were received.
Various machine gun posts  were also installed and it is typical of the Atlantik Wall defenses that various calibre’s were thought to be in use here. There was also an anti tank gun and an 50 mm mortar mounted in a Tobruk. In common with most strong points there was a small fire control post or observation bunker to keep watch over the sea.
Before the casemates  were completed the cannons were mounted on concrete platforms.

Cornwall Regimental Museum

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The Cornwall Regimental Museum is a local military history is depicted through 12,000 artifacts including weapons & battlefield letters.

Bodmin Keep is over 160 years old and is the historic home of the Army in Cornwall.  This former headquarters of the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry houses the museum, with more than three hundred years of military history, a library and meeting rooms. Each of the 12,000 collection items has its own story to tell. Stories about the battles that have been fought, weapons that were used or personal letters that were written on the battlefield.

World War II Glider & Military Museum

The World War II Glider and Military Museum opened in July 2011, features one of only seven fully-restored CG-4A gliders in the world, as well as extensive military displays. During World War II, the Ford Motor Company’s plant in Kingsford built more Model CG-4A gliders for the United States Army than any other company in the nation at much less cost than other manufacturers. (Menominee Range Historical Foundation)

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Consolidated B-24J Liberator | Collings Foundation

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This plane is the world’s only fully restored and flying Consolidated B-24J Liberator. The restoration took over five years and 97,000+ hours and involved original crew members and builders. Today, she is painted as “Witchcraft” in honor of the veterans of the 8th Air Force, who flew in the European Theater during WWII. The plan visits over 120 cities nationwide each year, flying as part of the Wings of Freedom Tour with the Collings Foundation. More than 18,000 Consolidated B-24 Liberator planes were built, making it one of the most produced heavy bomber and multi-engine aircraft in history. During World War II, it served in every branch of the US Armed Forces and in every combat theater. Design improvements allowed the plane a long range, high speed, and heavy bomb load. The Collings Foundation organizes living history events to help Americans learn more about their heritage through direct participation.

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Sueojangdae (Defense Commander’s Post)

Sueojangdae (Defense Commander’s Post) is a two-story military facility used for observation as well as for directing battles. This structure was built on the western side of Namhansanseong Fortress as one of four command posts. During the Manchu Invasion of 1636, King Injo himself helped to direct and encourage the troops from here. They held out for 45 days against a Qing force of 120,000, before finally being forced to surrender and accept vassal status to the Manchu Empire. (Visit Korea)

        

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Wounded Warrior Dogs Project

The Wounded Warrior Dogs Project is a traveling exhibition of wooden dog sculptures created by master Ohio craftsman James Mellick. The dogs are intended to be symbolic of the sacrifice and exhibit the same wounds as their human companions in battle. The installation of wounded and rehabilitated dogs intends to raise awareness and focus the attention on the sacrifice and needs of wounded veterans. To this end, these sculptures are not for sale but their display is for the purpose of raising money at various exhibition venues and donations will be made to local veterans organizations that serve wounded warriors. Six dogs representing service in various wars make up this project. The seventh dog, under the flag, made the ultimate sacrifice. This display is highly evocative in content and craftsmanship.

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U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum: Exhibit

Nearly 20 years from dream to reality, the U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum has become a place to honor and preserve the legendary feats of the airborne and special operations troops who have contributed so much to defend our nation’s interests.  From the early days of the Parachute Test Platoon to the ongoing War on Terrorism, the Airborne & Special Operations Museum recounts the actions of heroic soldiers.

The doors opened on 16 August 2000, the 60th anniversary of the original Test Platoon’s first parachute jump. The museum offers free admission, the main exhibit gallery, temporary gallery, four-story-tall theater, and a motion simulator ride.

The main gallery is designed as a self-guided tour, in chronological order, through the history of airborne and special operations soldiers from 1940 to the present.  The temporary gallery changes periodically and displays a myriad of exhibits pertaining to the United States Army airborne and special operations units through their history and conflicts from World War II to the present.

The Airborne & Special Operations Museum is owned and operated by the United States Army and is part of the United States Army Museum system.

The Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation supports the museum with marketing, advertising and financial support for its programs and exhibits. (Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation)

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U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum: Entrance

Nearly 20 years from dream to reality, the U.S. Army Airborne and Special Operations Museum has become a place to honor and preserve the legendary feats of the airborne and special operations troops who have contributed so much to defend our nation’s interests.  From the early days of the Parachute Test Platoon to the ongoing War on Terrorism, the Airborne & Special Operations Museum recounts the actions of heroic soldiers.

The doors opened on 16 August 2000, the 60th anniversary of the original Test Platoon’s first parachute jump. The museum offers free admission, the main exhibit gallery, temporary gallery, four-story-tall theater, and a motion simulator ride.

The main gallery is designed as a self-guided tour, in chronological order, through the history of airborne and special operations soldiers from 1940 to the present.  The temporary gallery changes periodically and displays a myriad of exhibits pertaining to the United States Army airborne and special operations units through their history and conflicts from World War II to the present.

The Airborne & Special Operations Museum is owned and operated by the United States Army and is part of the United States Army Museum system.

The Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation supports the museum with marketing, advertising and financial support for its programs and exhibits. (Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation)

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Cumbria’s Museum of Military Life

The Museum has been located in Carlisle Castle since 1932  but in 2014, with the help of Heritage Lottery Funding, it was moved from the Inner Ward to Alma block in the Outer Ward.

This provided more space and better access for visitors and gives us the opportunity to display items more effectively and even some of the collection’s vehicles.

Covering over 300 years of military history the Museum tells the stories of the 34th Regiment of foot, the 55th Regiment of foot, Border Regiment, King’s Own Royal Border Regiment and even the current serving Regiment The Duke of Lancaster’s.

The Museum now reinforces the strong links between Cumbria’s regiments and the local community and shares the remarkable stories of courage, loyalty and service.

Our Museum will continue to be an important source of information for former soldiers and their families, historians and family history researchers. By reaching out to schools and colleges, we’ll help keep the memories alive for future generations.

Cumbria’s Museum of Military Life is run by the King’s Own Royal Border Regiment Museum Fund, a Registered Charitable Trust (No. 271943) and accredited under the Museums, Libraries and Archives Registration Scheme (No. 435).

We are managed by a board of trustees and run on a daily basis by a committed team of curatorial staff. (Cumbria’s Museum of Military Life) Captured by: Envision360Limited

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Bunker BS-8

In the 1930s, Czechoslovakia decided to build a defense system around its borders, in response to the rise of Hitler and fascism to power. Bunkers and small fortresses began somewhere at the level of Ostrava, copied north of Moravia, then the northern, western and southern Bohemia, stretching with South Moravia to move to Slovakia and continue to Transcarpathian Ukraine, which then belonged to Czechoslovakia. Some defensive lines in Bohemia and Moravia were to be doubled according to original plans. Fortifications should be built for several years. After the “Munich betrayal” in 1938 and the subsequent division of Czechoslovakia in 1939, work on this defense system was stopped.

Several hundreds of objects have been built in Slovakia, of which several decades have been preserved in the valley of the Morava River, Bratislava, Komárno and other places along the southern border with Hungary. The only complete defensive section was preserved in Bratislava on the territory of Petržalka. Bunkers copied the state border. They start north along the Danube opposite Karlovy Vary, continue towards the border crossing of Berg, pass through Kopčany settlement, turn east to Lúka and beside the Croatian shoulder again end at the Danube. The line went along the Croatian shoulder because Rusovce, Jarovce, and Čunovo did not belong to Czechoslovakia during this period (it happened only after World War II).

BZ – 8 “Cemetery” is the largest and most powerful armed heavy building in Bratislava. It formed the back of the defense in the middle part of the suburbs and the only one is a full-fledged analog of the heavy objects built at other points of the border to defend against Germany. Other “modern” heavy objects in Bratislava Petržalka were built more economically. What allowed a lesser degree of threat to this part of the border, which then met with neutral Austria and weak Hungary. Nevertheless, it was necessary to demonstrate the determination to defend mainly the city of Slovakia, which was obviously sufficiently strong. Bratislavský zrub – 8, resistance “Roman” II. These modern buildings were built in Bratislava in the years 1936-38 (along with BZ IV, BZ 13 and BZ 15). Captured by: Jan Hamorsky

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Diefenbunker

Metropole Bomb Shelter

Narvik War Museum

The Narvik War Museum in Narvik, Norway is a museum reflecting on Narvik’s history throughout World War II. The exhibition begins its story with Germany’s initial attack on Narvik and Norway in April 1940. The exhibition looks at various war themes including conflict and human rights. Attendees are able to experience the exhibit is not only Norwegian, but also English, French, Polish, and German. (Matterport)

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Auckland Museum: Gallipoli in Minecraft

Explore the Gallipoli campaign in an exhibition featuring the interactive world of Minecraft® and incredible objects from the Auckland War Memorial Museum’s collections. Minecraft® is a hugely popular online game that is all about breaking and placing blocks. Since its inception players have worked together to create all sorts of incredible and imaginative things. The Gallipoli Campaign was a campaign of World War I. Allied forces invaded the Gallipoli peninsula (in Modern-Day Turkey) on April 25, 1915, with the aim of capturing Constantinople, the capital of the Ottoman Empire. After eight months of brutal fighting, the Allies withdrew. The campaign is remembered every year in Australia and New Zealand on ANZAC Day, April 25. (Matterport) Captured by: Property3D

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The Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS)

The Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) is a prototype of a habitat for humans to experiment and see what it would be like to work and live on Mars. The station simulates the type of environment that would serve as the main base for months of exploration in the harsh Martian environment. The MDRS hosts scientists, engineers, and sometimes college students in relative isolation for 2-3 weeks to research technology, operations, and science associated with human space exploration. The two-story cylindrical building, dubbed the “Hab”, was built in 2001 and can house seven crew members at any time.

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Rose Island Lighthouse

The Rose Island Light, built in 1870, is on Rose Island in Narragansett Bay in Newport, Rhode Island in the United States. It is preserved, maintained and operated by The Rose Island Lighthouse Foundation.

One of a group of New England lighthouses built to an award-winning design by Vermont architect Albert Dow,[3] Rose Island Light has sisters at Sabin PointPomham Rocks, and Colchester Reef. The lighthouse stands atop a bastion of Fort Hamilton, which was built in 1798-1800.

The building was abandoned as a functioning lighthouse in 1970, when the Newport Bridge was constructed nearby. In 1984, the Rose Island Lighthouse Foundation was founded to restore the dilapidated light on behalf of the City of Newport, which had received it for free from the United States government.[5] In 1987, the federal government listed the lighthouse on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1992 it was relit as a private aid to navigation.[1][2]

The lighthouse is today a travel destination, reached only by boat. For a fee to the Foundation, visitors can spend a night as a guest or a week as the “lighthouse keeper,” completing many of the chores required to keep the lighthouse in good condition. (Wikipedia)

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Novosiltsevskaya Battery

The battery numbers six Kane (6-inches guns) and two Nordenfeld (57-mm guns). The fort’s construction was begun in 1898 and completed in 1902.

About 180 thousand rubles were spent on the construction. More than 100 years after, the battery is fully renovated and it is one of the most visited places of interest. The beautiful panoramic view of the bridge opens from here. The route to the battery goes through the Pospelovo settlement. (Russia Travel)

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HMS Belfast | Imperial War Museums

The HMS Belfast was originally a light cruiser vessel built for the United Kingdom’s Royal Navy. Commissioned in 1939 shortly before World War II, the HMS Belfast was used in the Royal Navy’s war efforts including a naval blockade against Germany, escort missions for the Soviet Union, and the Battle of North Cape. During World War II, the HMS Belfast also supported the Normandy landings. Today, the ship permanently sits along the River Thames in London, UK as a museum. (Wikipedia)

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Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress

“Flying Fortress” because of its many machine gun mounts. Only a few of these historic aircrafts survive today. In this model, you can explore the entire body of the plane, including the cockpit, bombardier’s seat, radio room, and the fuselage.This particular aircraft was restored to wartime configuration by The Collings Foundation. It is named “Nine-O-Nine” in honor of a 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron plane of the same name which completed 140 missions without an abort or loss of a single crewman. Today, she flies as part of the Wings of Freedom tour. The Collings Foundation organizes living history events to help Americans learn more about their heritage through direct participation. (Matterport)

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Boeing B-29 Superfortress

The Boeing B-29 Superfortress is a heavy bomber used primarily by the United State in both World War II and the Korean War. This particular plane, known as T-Square 54, flew 37 bombing missions with the 87th Bomb Squadron, 498th Bomb Group in World War II and was converted to an aerial refueling tanker for the Korean War. Today, this Boeing B-29 can be found in the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington. (Matterport)

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Churchill War Rooms

The Churchill War Rooms in London is a museum located inside the British government’s former underground command center during World War II. The museum is dedicated to the life and legacy of Winston Churchill who served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. Churchill’s speeches and radio broadcasts during the war are considered to be some of the most influential and inspirational speeches of any world leader ever known. (Matterport)

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Royal Air Force Vulcan Bomber

The Avro Vulcan (later Hawker Siddeley Vulcan from July 1963) is a jet-powered tailless delta wing high-altitude strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A.V. Roe and Company (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the most technically advanced and hence the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles.

The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War between the United Kingdom and Argentina in 1982.

The Vulcan had no defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. Electronic countermeasures were employed by the B.1 (designated B.1A) and B.2 from circa 1960. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid-1970s nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refueling.

After retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named “The Spirit of Great Britain” was restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426, and XM655, have been kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. B.2 XH558 flew for the last time in October 2015, before also being kept in taxiable condition at Doncaster Sheffield Airport. (Wikipedia)

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“Air Force One” Boeing VC-137B

The Flying Oval Office

The first presidential jet plane, a specially built Boeing 707-120, is known as SAM (Special Air Missions) 970. This aircraft, as well as any other Air Force aircraft, carried the call sign “Air Force One” when the president was aboard. Delivered in 1959 to replace Eisenhower’s Super-Constellation, the high-speed jet transport is a flying Oval Office with a modified interior and sophisticated communication equipment.

Jet technology gave a president the opportunity to meet face-to-face with world leaders easily. SAM 970 has carried presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon as well as VIPs such as Nikita Khrushchev and Henry Kissinger.

By 1962, SAM 970 was replaced by a newer Boeing VC-137C. But SAM 970 remained in the presidential fleet ferrying VIPs and the Vice-President until June of 1996.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Museum of Flight)

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Submarine Lembit

EML Lembit is one of two Kalev-class mine-laying submarines built for the Republic of Estonia before World War II and is now a museum ship at Seaplane Harbour in Tallinn. She was launched in 1936 at Vickers and Armstrongs Ltd., Barrow-in-Furness in England, and served in the Estonian Navy and the Soviet Navy. Until she was hauled out on 21 May 2011, Lembit was the oldest submarine still afloat in the world. Her sister ship, Kalev, was sunk in October 1941. 

Lembit is the only surviving warship of the pre-war Estonian Navy and in the Baltic countries. Estonia is a maritime nation, and like every country with a long coastline to defend, it has to safeguard its territorial waters. With regard to experience gained and observed during World War I, submarines found their proper application in the pre–World War II Estonian Navy. The collection organized by the Submarine Fleet Foundation in May 1933 developed into one of the most successful undertakings among similar fundraising events nationwide.

In the course of building and testing the two submarines, the Estonian crews received training in Great Britain between 1935-1937. Throughout 1937–1940, Lembit and her sister ship Kalev were the most imposing vessels in the Estonian Navy. Their inactivity in the annexation of Estonia by the USSR was a political decision. (Wikipedia)

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Kvarven Fort

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Kvarven Fort was a mountain fort strategically located by the main shipping channel of the Byfjorden leading to Bergen, Norway.

Jewish History Museum: Holocaust History Center

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The Holocaust History Center at the Jewish History Museum is an educational institute dedicated to an ongoing examination of the Holocaust through the lived experiences of individuals who survived the war and later lived in Southern Arizona.  To date, over 260 individuals from 18 nations have been identified as those who were persecuted by Nazism, survived, and later arrived in southern Arizona.  These individuals, our neighbors, who have contributed to our community in numerous ways, are highlighted in the Center’s examination of this complex history. The Center purposefully situated the Holocaust along the spectrum of genocidal violence that remains a consistent feature of the human experience today. Additionally, the Holocaust History Center is committed to illuminating contemporary human rights abuses as they occur.

NASA Shuttle Fuselage Trainer

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The FFT is a full-scale mockup of the space shuttle orbiter — without the wings. It was used as a testbed for upgrades to the shuttle fleet and for astronaut training such as extra-vehicular activity (EVA) and emergency egress. Built at Johnson Space Center in the 1970s, it was the oldest mockup in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF). The FFT includes flight-quality systems, such as a payload bay, lighting and closed circuit TV (CCTV).

The Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF) was located inside Building 9 of Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. It housed several space shuttle mockups, including the FFT, as well as mockups of every major pressurized module on the International Space Station. It was primarily used for astronaut training and systems familiarization.

It typically took at least a year and sometimes longer for astronauts to train, depending on the objectives of the mission. Each crew spent up to 100 hours training in the SVMF in more than 20 separate classes.

While many of the systems in the SVMF are flight-like, they do not contain what is generally known as simulators (as used to train pilots). Instead, the FFT and other trainers in the SVMF were used for astronaut training in housekeeping, in-flight maintenance, stowage familiarity, ingress/egress, etc.

It took a versatile team comprising a variety of skills and experience to develop, maintain and operate the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility. Specialists such as designers, engineers, project managers, electronic technicians and shop technicians were used to create the accurate mockups to train astronauts, test systems, and procedures, and serve as gravity-bound simulations. (Museum of Flight)

Castle Van Male

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Male Castle (DutchKasteel van Male) is a former castle in Male, once a separate village, now part of Sint-Kruis, a suburb of BrugesWest FlandersBelgium. The buildings, almost entirely rebuilt and restored after the destruction of World War II, have housed St. Trudo’s Abbey (Sint-Trudoabdij) since 1954.

The castle’s origins date back to the 9th century, as a defensive tower for protection of the territory around Bruges against the Vikings. Male was held by Philip of Alsace, Count of Flanders, between 1168 and 1191, who replaced the wooden structure with one built of stone, which included a chapel consecrated by the exiled archbishop of CanterburyThomas Becket, in 1166.

The castle was a residence of the Counts of Flanders (in 1329 it was the birthplace of Count Louis II, sometimes known as Louis of Male) but was also a stronghold in a much-disputed terrain. French forces occupied it. The city of Bruges retook it from its French garrison in the uprising of 1302. Soldiers from Ghent razed it in 1382 and after it had been rebuilt, ransacked it again in 1453. In 1473 it was burnt out and once again rebuilt: the present keep dates from that rebuilding and stands with its foundations directly in the moat, now flanked by symmetrical wings. The castle was plundered yet again in 1490 by the forces of the Count of Nassau.

When Flanders became a part of the Burgundian Netherlands Male retained its importance. During the Spanish occupation of the Low Countries, the citadel was sold in 1558 by Philip II to Juan Lopez Gallo.

It was occupied by German troops in both world wars and was severely damaged.

This mighty castle is now the property of the family Deprez. (Wikipedia)