Climbing 1 World Trade Center: Man on Spire

Climb to the top of 1 World Trade Center with the professional mountaineer and photographer Jimmy Chin.

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1TYmhew

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Kittery Historical Museum

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The Kittery Historical Museum is a treasure trove of local history. It is chock-a-block full of Kittery’s rich past, including artifacts from its maritime and military heritage. Visit the Museum to see them for yourself!

Since it opened in 1977, the Museum has expanded its collections from days gone by. We focus on the history of Kittery and its naval heritage. (Note: The shipyard has a navy museum of its own.)

In 2002, the Museum was expanded to accommodate the Andrews-Mitchell garrison house. This was a fortified farmstead that offered protection from raids in turbulent Colonial days. Remnants of that building are now inside the Museum.

New exhibits for 2020

Lobster fishing in Kittery
Pepperrell Cove / Ski Club
Special art and exhibit gallery
Enhanced Digital Timeline

Affordable admission

Adults $7.
Children $3.
Families $15.
Group rates available.

Discounts for seniors, military,
AAA, and Kittery residents!

Members of our Society: free.

Maniniholo Dry Cave

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Legend states that Manini-holo, chief fisherman of the mythical Menehune people, dug this cave to find evil spirits who stole fish.

USS Croaker

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USS Croaker

SS-246 is on the National Register of Historic Places and represents the Navy’s “silent service”. One of 77 Gato class submarines constructed, she was part of the most lethal submarine class of WWII. Commissioned in 1944, she celebrated her 75th birthday in 2019. Conducting six war patrols in the pacific theater, she sank 11 Japanese vessels, four of which were capital or military vessels, and seven auxiliary or support vessels.

She is not in her original WWII Configuration, as after WWII she was converted to a “hunter-killer” submarine with added sonar, radar and quieting capabilities to combat the Russian threat during the Cold War. She was decommissioned in 1971 and brought to the Buffalo Naval Park in 1988. Head below to see what it was like to be part of the 80-man crew.

SS-246

Length: 311 feet
Beam: 27 feet
Draft: 17 feet
Displacement: 1,525 tons
Armament: Eight Mk-44 torpedo tubes
Complement: 81 Sailors

Colonial National Historical Park: Yorktown Battlefield – Redoubt 9

Colonial National Historical Park is located in the Hampton Roads region of Virginia and is operated by the National Park Service of the United States government. The park protects and interprets several sites relating to the Colony of Virginia and the history of the United States more broadly, ranging from the site of the first landing of the English settlers who would settle at Jamestown, to the battlefields of Yorktown where the British Army was finally defeated in the American Revolutionary War. Over 3 million people visit the park each year.(Wikipedia)

Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima

Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, with the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement. The two bombings killed between 129,000 and 226,000 people, most of whom were civilians, and remain the first and only uses of nuclear weapons in armed conflict.(Wikipedia)

What’s inside the Washington Monument?

After being closed for 3 years, we show you never before view of the greatest tourist attraction in DC! Whether watching on your phone or in VR180, you can see this national treasure in an incredible way. Make sure to turn up the quality of your viewing experience to 5k, if you have a headset use that for VR viewing, or move your finger around on the screen to see all angles of this incredible monument to America’s First President. Huge thanks to the US Department of the Interior for giving us this incredible access before it reopens on September 19th 2019.

The Washington Monument is an obelisk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate George Washington, once commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, in the American Revolutionary War and the first President of the United States. (Wikipedia)

Height555′
EstablishedJanuary 31, 1848
OpenedOctober 9, 1888
Floors3

American Revolution

“On the afternoon of April 19, 1775. the first day of the American Revolution is unfolding.” Two hundred and forty-one years after the original battle, scores of professional reenactors, organizers, onlookers and photographers gather at Lexington and Concord and Minute Man National Historical Park to honor the memory of this critical turning point in American history.

Bunker WN-62

Almost at the very eastern end of Omaha beach, just below the American Cemetery is Wn62 a German strong point. These strong points were located all along the Atlantic Wall as a first line of defense against an attack by the Allies. No two strong points were the same, each one being designed for the location and also with what equipment was available.
WN62 had as its major armament two 75 mm cannon housed in H669 casemates. These are bizarre as it would seem that the camouflage  is on the interior of the casemate and not the outside. One of the guns had been moved away from the site by D-day.
They were aimed along the beach to the west and had large concrete walls protruding to the seaward side at the front to protect then from an attack directly from the front.
Although the Germans manning the guns were billeted in the village a house nearby was used to feed the troops and allowed them to rest whilst on guard here.
There were two small bunkers used to house ammunition .
Two larger bunkers, served to house ammunition, and in times of bombardments
personnel, which the nearer D-day approached the more bombardments were received.
Various machine gun posts  were also installed and it is typical of the Atlantik Wall defenses that various calibre’s were thought to be in use here. There was also an anti tank gun and an 50 mm mortar mounted in a Tobruk. In common with most strong points there was a small fire control post or observation bunker to keep watch over the sea.
Before the casemates  were completed the cannons were mounted on concrete platforms.

Behringer-Crawford Museum

The “William Behringer Memorial Museum” opened July 5th, 1950 showing off the collections of a late world traveler. Visitors would see a mounted stuffed life- sized black bear, birds, small game, the emblematic two-headed calf, American Indian artifacts and other unforgettable “curiosities.”

Also seen was the elegant streetcar “Kentucky.” Built in 1892, it had just been retired from public use and has since been restored. Streetcar lines had connected the river cities–centers of service and heavy industry and multi-ethnic urban life.

Under the first curator, Ellis Crawford, the museum co-sponsored nearby digs which yielded many more artifacts including large paleo bones from historic Big Bone Springs.

In 1979-80, after adding fire safety and restoration components, the museum reopened as the Behringer-Crawford Museum. Staff and volunteers increased public programming–Junior Curator archeology, arts, crafts and visual and performing arts. Permanent displays showed natural history, archeology, paleontology, mineralogy, rivers and steamboats, industry, folk art, politics, frontier home life, the Civil War and slavery. Special temporary exhibits added other attractions.

A regional museum, BCM has documented historic Civil War battery sites in three counties, including those in Devou Park.

In the early 1990s the museum built an outdoor amphitheater where people enjoy an annual freshART auction and a weekly summer concert series. During the holiday season, children, parents and grandparents enjoy watching the very popular toy trains and pushing the many interactive electrical buttons.

The region has been a hub for Rivers, Roads, Rails and Runways. In the last decade BCM added 15,000 square feet–adopting the theme of “Transportation.”

Other incisive themes include immigration, tourism and entertainment, municipal and regional planning and the local arts heritage.

The museum meets the standards set by the Americans for Disabilities Act. Newly renovated to better educate and entertain, Behringer-Crawford Museum will be 70 years old in 2020.

— John Boh, historian

Pilgrim Howland House

The Jabez Howland House is the only existing house in Plymouth where Pilgrims actually spent time. The original 17th-century two-story timber-framed house consisted of the porch, hall and hall chamber.  Jabez Howland, John and Elizabeth’s son, lived here with his family until they sold the house in 1680.  It was a private residence until 1912 when it was purchased for a museum. The Howland House is a National Register of Historic Places site.

Chateau Bellevue – Austin Woman’s Club

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Chateau Bellevue is home of the Austin Woman’s Club. The members of the Austin Woman’s Club have cared for and preserved this historic building since 1929. Originally built as a private home, the building is now an events venue in downtown Austin, Texas.

 

Boston Marathon – Bombing Attack

The Boston Marathon is an annual long distance running event hosted by several cities in greater Boston in eastern Massachusetts, United States. It is always held on Patriots’ Day, the third Monday of April. (Wikipedia)

During the annual Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, two homemade pressure cooker bombs detonated 12 seconds and 210 yards apart at 2:49 p.m., near the finish line of the race, killing three people and injuring several hundred others, including 16 who lost limbs. (Wikipedia)

 

World Trade Center – September 11

The original World Trade Center was a large complex of seven buildings in Lower Manhattan, New York City, United States. It featured the landmark Twin Towers, which opened on April 4, 1973 and were destroyed in 2001 during the September 11 attacks.

 

Titanic

RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City.

 

Mill Girl

The Mill Girl by Antoinette Prien Schultze in Manchester New Hampshire. Like many towns on the Merrimack River in New England they experienced immense growth from the Industrial Revolution in particular the textile industry. The textile mills were one of the first to employ women on a massive scale. This statue represents those women who are largely forgotten as a key factor in Americas explosive growth.

Logan County Transportation Museum

The Logan County Transportation Museum addition opened in April 2014. The building was designed by architect Karen Beasley of Beasley Architecture and Design in Bellefontaine. It was designed in the spirit of the Big Four/New York Central Roundhouse railroad that stood in Bellefontaine from the late 1890s to the 1960s.

The building was made possible through a Transportation Enhancement Grant from the Ohio Department of Transportation. The ODOT grant paid 80% of the $3 million project. The Historical Society raised the rest of the money through donations from local businesses, industries and individuals. The complete list of donors can be seen in the entry of the Transportation

Museum, as well as a dedication board acknowledging many individuals who played a key role in the project.

The first floor bays are dedicated to numerous exhibits on Logan County’s important role in transportation.

The second floor houses the Logan County Genealogical Society and their library and the Logan County Historical Society’s Archives, as well as the AcuSport Meeting Room.

World War II Glider & Military Museum

The World War II Glider and Military Museum opened in July 2011, features one of only seven fully-restored CG-4A gliders in the world, as well as extensive military displays. During World War II, the Ford Motor Company’s plant in Kingsford built more Model CG-4A gliders for the United States Army than any other company in the nation at much less cost than other manufacturers. (Menominee Range Historical Foundation)

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City of Boston Archaeology Program: Shirley-Eustis House

The City of Boston Archaeology Program’s dig will be limited to 50 cm (20″) wide trenches in the areas that will be disturbed by future work. These trenches will allow us to document the presence, absence, and depth of any important features such as the kitchen or privy. We will NOT be excavating these fully if they are found, at least not yet. If found, we will spend the winter talking with the Shirley-Eustis House and the neighborhood to decide if and how much of the historic deposits should be dug before the work begins. If the decision is to excavate, we will come back in 2019 to do so.

The Shirley-Eustis House dig will begin October 1 and last 2-3 weeks. Follow along as we uncover new insights into Roxbury’s 18th and 19th-century history #DigROX #DigSEH #DigBOS (City of Boston Archaeology Program)

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Brown Canyon Ranch

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Brown Canyon Ranch, formerly known as the Barchas Ranch, is a historic ranch located in the foothills of the Huachuca Mountains, near Sierra Vista, Arizona.

The land Brown Canyon Ranch is on was first settled around 1880 by John Thomas Brown, who owned a hotel a few miles away in neighboring Ramsey Canyon. Following a succession of owners, the land eventually ended up in the hands of the brothers James and Tom Haverty. Between 1905 and 1907, James and his brother built what is today the most prominent building in the canyon, a modest three-room adobe home, now known as the Brown Canyon Ranch House. James and his wife Lessie homesteaded the ranch in 1912 and lived there until 1921, when it was sold to William and Margaret Carmichael.

The Carmichaels were major landowners in the Sierra Vista area and did not take up residence at the house. Instead, they rented it out to a local miner named Harvey James and later a Yaqui Indian named Chico Romero and his family. In 1946, the Carmichaels sold the ranch to Roy and Stella Rambo, who raised cattle on it until 1957, when it was again sold to Samuel and Cecile Barchas. The Barchas family did not live on the ranch, either, but they raised livestock on it all the way up until 1997. One year later it was deeded to the United States Forest Service in a land exchange.

Efforts to preserve and restore the historic ranch house, as well as its associated outbuildings, has been underway since 1998. In addition to the ranch house, there is also a one-room adobe storeroom adjacent to the house, a wooden corral and outhouse, the stone ruins of a barn, and a pair of man-made ponds, which are now used as a preserve for the endangered Chiricahua leopard frog. Further up the trail is a small graveyard known as the Brown Canyon Cemetery, followed by the ruins of an old house and the remains of the Pomono Mine. The ranch is open to hikers and picnickers, free of charge, for day use only.

(Wikipedia)

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Consolidated B-24J Liberator | Collings Foundation

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This plane is the world’s only fully restored and flying Consolidated B-24J Liberator. The restoration took over five years and 97,000+ hours and involved original crew members and builders. Today, she is painted as “Witchcraft” in honor of the veterans of the 8th Air Force, who flew in the European Theater during WWII. The plan visits over 120 cities nationwide each year, flying as part of the Wings of Freedom Tour with the Collings Foundation. More than 18,000 Consolidated B-24 Liberator planes were built, making it one of the most produced heavy bomber and multi-engine aircraft in history. During World War II, it served in every branch of the US Armed Forces and in every combat theater. Design improvements allowed the plane a long range, high speed, and heavy bomb load. The Collings Foundation organizes living history events to help Americans learn more about their heritage through direct participation.

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Thomas Boggs House

In 1866, former trader Thomas O. Boggs founded the agricultural community of Boggsville, the first such community in Bent County and one of the earliest in the state. Unoccupied since 1975, the Boggs’ family house, shown here, has been restored as part of the Boggsville Historic Site.

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Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village: Bigelow House

Originally located near New and Smith Roads, this house was built between 1840 and 1857 by Henry Bigelow, one of Amherst’s early residents. The house was constructed in the “saltbox” style, named for the distinctive pitched roof that slopes from the two-story front to the single story in the back which resembled a wooden lidded box in which salt was once kept. While not common in this area, the saltbox style was prevalent in Bigelow’s New England birthplace. The interior is furnished to reflect the most probable use of the house at that time—the home of Bigelow’s farm manager.

You can visit the Bigelow House at the BNHV campus at 3755 Tonawanda Creek Road, Amherst, NY 14228 or online at BNHV.org.

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Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village: Rubeck House

This small plank house c.1840 is a typical first small structure often built by the earliest residents of Western New York. Unlike most other homes of this type, Rubeck House was never enlarged. Originally located near Dann and Smith Roads on property owned by the Lapp family, the house was likely rented to a poor tenant farmer or farmhand.

You can visit the Rubeck House at the BNHV campus at 3755 Tonawanda Creek Road, Amherst, NY 14228 or online at BNHV.org.

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Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village: Schmitt Log House

Originally located in what was known as the “French Settlement” c. 1843 area near Ellicott Creek Road and Niagara Falls Boulevard, this log house was constructed of hand-hewn logs. Built by the Schmitt family upon arriving in Amherst, NY, from Alsace-Lorraine. It was occupied by Henry Smith, his wife, his mother-in-law, six young children and possibly a farmhand. This home, with only two first floor rooms and an attic loft, is typical of the many log houses built in Amherst by German settlers.

You can visit the Schmitt Log House at the BNHV campus at 3755 Tonawanda Creek Road, Amherst, NY 14228 or online at BNHV.org.

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Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village: Elliot House

Built in 1851 at the corner of Garrison Road and Park Drive in Williamsville, this house was occupied by George W. Elliott, a “ploughmaker,” his wife, two daughters, and son until 1855, when it was sold to satisfy Elliott’s creditors. The re-created kitchen wing contains a replica 1850 cooking stove used for cooking demonstrations. Note the Greek Revival doorway with leaded glass sidelights.

You can visit the Lavocat House at the BNHV campus at 3755 Tonawanda Creek Road, Amherst, NY 14228 or online at BNHV.org.

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Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village: Lavocat House

The original section of this farmhouse c.1840, formerly located on New Road between Millersport Highway and Tonawanda Creek Road, was built with a technique known as nogging construction. With exterior walls comprised of layers of brick between wood framing, this technique provided strength and insulation. The home is used for weaving demonstrations during events.

You can visit the Lavocat House at the BNHV campus at 3755 Tonawanda Creek Road, Amherst, NY 14228 or online at BNHV.org.

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Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village: Blacksmith Shop

The blacksmith provided one of the most important services in the community. He was able to make or repair nearly everything that was made of iron. While many blacksmith shops were larger, this replica C. 1899 shop is typical of the smaller, one-man smiths found on farms. Demonstrations are performed at the BNHV by members of the New York State Designer Blacksmith organization.

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John Vogler House

Constructed 1819, restored 1955

John Vogler and his new wife Christina Spach moved into the house when it was finished. John was a silversmith and was active in Salem’s community through service on church boards and leadership in the Sunday School movement. John and Christina had three children, Lisetta, Louisa, and Elias.

When you visit the Vogler house the year is 1840. Lisetta is grown and married. Elias is a teenager being schooled in Pennsylvania and returning home again. The nature of John’s business has changed with time as Salem and the entire nation moved toward a market economy with mass-produced goods. The Vogler House features the family’s public and private living spaces along with John’s shop and a scullery housing a bake oven and smithy. Many furnishings are original to the Vogler family.

The house was architecturally seminal as one of the first to follow emerging American national styles in Salem, most residences to that point had been based on traditional Germanic forms and plans. The roof lost the iconic ‘kick’ at the eaves, the facade is symmetrical, and there is a pedimented hood over the front door, with a painted clock face reflecting his trade as a clock repairer. (oldsalem.org)

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Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park | Moore House

The Moore Cabin was restored in 1985-86 in time for its 100th birthday, and the house was restored in 1995-1997 in time for the City of Skagway’s 100th anniversary. Several interior rooms have been restored based on photographs taken by the Moores in 1904, such as the one below. The Park continues to restore the landscape surrounding the Moore House and Cabin to the 1904 period.
A visit to the restored Moore House today shows us how one family dealt with the gold rush, and their triumphs and tragedies remind us of the struggles faced by those dealing with a rapidly changing society. (National Park Service)

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Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park | Jeff. Smiths Parlor

One of Skagway’s most prominent buildings, the Jeff. Smiths Parlor Museum is forever connected to the notorious outlaw Jefferson Randolph “Soapy” Smith. Although Smith led his nefarious band of con men from its cramped rooms, he only occupied the building for three short months before his death in a gunfight. What happened to the building after Smith’s demise is an unexpected story with a surprising array of owners, uses, and relocations. In 1935, Skagway promoter Martin Itjen converted the Jeff. Smiths Parlor into a home-spun museum with gold-rush era artifacts, folk art, strange taxidermy, and even animatronic manikins. Read more… (National Park Service)

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Alexander Hamilton’s Grave

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Alexander Hamilton was one of the founding fathers of the United States and was also the first Secretary of the Treasury under George Washington’s administration. Vice President Aaron Burr and Hamilton challenged each other to a pistol duel which was the culmination of the pair’s long and bitter animosity for one another. Hamilton was mortally wounded by Burr and died the following day on July 12, 1804. Hamilton was buried in the Trinity Churchyard Cemetery in Manhattan, New York where his grave still stands today.

Allandale Mansion

Allandale is host to a rich history that intersects at key points in Kingsport history throughout the last century. But a lot can happen in that time, so we’ve broken it up into digestible points of interest for you. Explore this list of helpful links at your leisure and learn how Allandale came to be a key East Tennessee landmark.

Timashenko, landscape architect to President Dwight Eisenhower, designed and managed the details for the original Allandale grounds. Mr. Wassum [of Marion, Virginia], who also landscaped portions of the White House, was hired to arrange and plant the boxwoods and formal gardens. Allandale Mansion was planned around existing trees [which were by then centuries old], and additional large trees were imported by flat-bed truck and planted throughout the property.

Two large ponds were dug primarily to provide fire protection for the house, but also to beautify the grounds. Original plans also called for a substantial swimming pool complete with Grecian columns and statues.

In recent years, additional bedding plants [as well as dogwoods, magnolias, crepe myrtles, azaleas, boxwoods, and rhododendron] have been added to the back garden, and the Elise Brice Bourne formal rose garden was planted by her husband and friends to commemorate Mrs. Bourne’s dedicated service to the Friends of Allandale.

Most recently, Dr. Harry Coover and his family donated the “Heron Dome” in memory of his deceased wife, Mrs. Muriel Zumbach Coover. The “Dome” features a bronze heron sculpture in a shallow pool, surrounded by benches, landscaping, and lighting to make the structure suitable for evening events [such as weddings, parties, and social gatherings – or simply a quiet spot for reflection and enjoyment of nature’s beauty]. (Allandale) Captured by: TriReality

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Bent County/Las Animas Cemetery

For more than 160 years, the current Bent County/Las Animas Cemetery has served as a community burial ground and the final resting place for several famous names in Colorado history.

One famous Coloradan who rests there is fur trader William Bent, who with his brother built and operated the famous Bent’s Fort. A replica of the 1840s adobe fort is now a National Historic Site.

The cemetery is also the burial site of Amache Prowers, an influential Cheyenne woman who married one of the men in the Prowers family. The Prowers were early Coloradans who settled near Boggsville, adjacent to the area that is now the cemetery. (Susan M. Thornton)

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Jim Crow Museum

The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State UniversityBig RapidsMichigan, displays a wide variety of everyday artifacts depicting the history of racist portrayals of African Americans in American popular culture. The mission of the Jim Crow Museum is to use objects of intolerance to teach tolerance and promote social justice.

The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia has a collection of over 10,000 objects, primarily created between the 1870s and the 1960s. It also includes contemporary objects.

The museum demonstrates how racist ideas and anti-black images were pervasive within American culture. It also shows how these images and ideas have resurfaced in recent years. Stories about African American achievements during the Jim Crow era, along with artifacts of the Civil Rights Movement, are also found within the museum. (Wikipedia) Captured by: Real Space

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Hotel Henry

3rd Floor

Buffalo’s Urban Resort

Hotel Henry Urban Resort Conference Center makes innovative new use of one of Western New York’s most iconic architectural landmarks. Widely considered to be one of Buffalo’s most important and beautiful buildings, construction on the 145-year-old Richardson Olmsted Campus began in 1872 and opened in 1880 as the state-of-the-art Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane. Henry Hobson Richardson, who is one of “The Recognized Trinity of American Architecture,” constructed this Richardson Romanesque-style campus of buildings more than 145 years ago alongside Dr. Thomas Story Kirkbride, developer of the Kirkbride Plan to improve medical care for mental health patients. America’s landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Central Park in New York City, as well as Buffalo’s beautiful park system, designed the grounds and gardens throughout the campus alongside Calvert Vaux.

The Richardson Olmsted Campus is recognized as a National Historic Landmark, a nationally significant historic place, designated by the Secretary of the Interior, possessing exceptional value or interpreting the nation’s heritage. For decades, countless citizens and constituencies have invested in saving these historically and culturally important structures. From individual grassroots preservationists to organized boards and New York State allocations, an immense collaborative effort led to the establishment of the Richardson Center Corporation. Since its formation, the Richardson Center Corporation has completed essential planning reports, stabilized the buildings, re-landscaped the South Lawn, and searched for new uses and leaseholders to help fund rehabilitation of the campus.

NEW LIFE AS AN ASSET FOR WESTERN NEW YORK

Now, with generous funding from CityInn Buffalo, LLC hospitality group, New York State, and historic tax credits, Hotel Henry Urban Resort Conference Center is proud to open a new chapter for the campus and surrounding neighborhoods. Hotel Henry Urban Resort Conference Center is proud to be the first phase and 1/3 of the redevelopment of the Richardson Olmsted Campus, bringing new life and meaning to the National Historic Landmark. As a successful first leaseholder within the Richardson Olmsted Campus, Hotel Henry is paving the way for more leasing interest and the rehabilitation of the rest of the campus.

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Traverse County Museum

Located in former Milwaukee Railroad Depot. Featuring old kitchen/living room/bedroom/sewing room exhibits. Old farm machinery display. General store/bank/post office/jewelry store/produce/butcher shop/blacksmith shop/doctor& dentist offices/dress shop/newspaper office and church exhibits. The restored one-room school, railroad caboose, old fire truck and car display. Many other antique/vintage items as well. (Explore Minnesota)

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Fearless Girl versus Charging Bull

Fearless Girl is a bronze sculpture by Kristen Visbal, commissioned by State Street Global Advisors via McCann New York, depicting a Latina girl facing the Charging Bull statue. Wikipedia

Charging Bull, which is sometimes referred to as the Wall Street Bull or the Bowling Green Bull, is a bronze sculpture that stands in Bowling Green in the Financial District in Manhattan, New York City. Wikipedia

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Booth Western Art Museum

Open since 2003, the Booth Museum houses the largest permanent exhibition space for Western art in the country, and it is the second largest art museum in Georgia. In this model, visit the lobby and American West galleries, where you will see iconic views, an entire stagecoach, and works by premier Western artists including George Catlin, Charles M. Russell, and Frederic Remington. The Booth Museum also houses collections of Native American, Civil War, and Presidential art. (Matterport) Captured by: Real Tour

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ʻIolani Palace

The ʻIolani Palace was the royal residence of the rulers of the Kingdom of Hawaii beginning with Kamehameha III under the Kamehameha Dynasty and ending with Queen Liliʻuokalani under the Kalākaua Dynasty, founded by her brother, King David Kalākaua. Iolani Palace is the last residence of the Hawaiian monarchy and the only royal palace in the US. (Wikipedia)

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Henry Ford Museum: Rosa Parks Bus

On Dec. 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on this bus and was arrested for violating segregation law. Her arrest sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which lasted for 381 days until segregation on public buses was repealed. Parks’ stance and the boycott were important events that raised awareness for the civil rights movement. Today, the bus is preserved at the Henry Ford Museum. In this model, board the bus and take Parks’ seat in the third row on the left. (Matterport)

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ClubCorp Holdings – Metropolitan Club

ClubCorp (NASDAQ: MYCC) is an American corporation with a home office in Dallas and is the largest owner and operator of private golf and country clubs in the country. It owns or operates more than 200 golf and country clubs and business, sports and alumni clubs worldwide.


Located in 26 states, the District of Columbia and two foreign countries, the company and the clubs in its network services more than 430,000 members and employ approximately 20,000 peak-season employees.

The Willis Tower, built as and still commonly referred to as the Sears Tower, is a 110-story, 1,450-foot skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Wikipedia Captured by: 360° 3D World

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Jefferson Memorial

Author of the Declaration of Independence, Statesman and Visionary for the founding of a Nation. Read More · Statue being lifted into place. History of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial. Bronze Statue being lifted into place within the Memorial Chamber. Last updated: July 11, 2016. National Mall and Memorial Parks. (National Park Service)

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Sibley Historic Site

Visit the oldest Euro-American settlement in Minnesota where four distinctive limestone buildings grace the Minnesota River bluff across from Historic Fort Snelling. These buildings mark the American Fur Company’s control over the region’s Dakota trade between 1825 and 1853, when Mendota was a major center of the region’s fur trade. The Sibley Historic Site is on the southern bluff of the Minnesota River upstream from its confluence with the Mississippi. The site includes four of Minnesota’s oldest buildings, including the home of Henry Hastings Sibley — fur trader, General, and controversial first Governor of Minnesota. The Sibley Historic Site offers events, seasonal guided tours, and a museum shop.

About Henry Sibley
Born on Feb. 20, 1811, in Detroit, Henry Hastings Sibley came to the junction of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers in 1834 as the regional manager of the American Fur Company. Sibley went on to become one of the most influential figures in Minnesota history. His career included working as the region’s most prominent fur trader; serving as a politician and territorial delegate to the U.S. Congress; election as the first governor of the state of Minnesota; and serving as a general during the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862.

The site of Sibley’s Mendota home (and eventually those of Jean Baptiste Faribault and Hypolite DuPuis) became the state’s first designated historic site, with restoration undertaken by the Minnesota district of the Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.) in 1910. The site is now owned by the Minnesota Historical Society and operated by the Dakota County Historical Society.

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William G. LeDuc House

A Short History

LeDuc Mansion with ScaffoldingConstruction on the LeDuc house began in 1862 and was completed in 1866.  Following LeDuc’s service as Quartermaster in the Civil War, the family moved into the unfinished home in August 1865.  In March 1865 he had been brevetted a brigadier general for “efficiency, intelligence, and zeal in the discharge of his duties”.

William G. LeDuc came to St. Paul, Minnesota Territory in 1850 from Ohio to open a bookstore and law office.  In 1854 he purchased a quarter share in the town of Hastings from Alexander Faribault.  In 1856, he and his wife Mary Bronson LeDuc, with their two daughters moved downriver to Hastings, where they had also acquired two wheat farms and 160 acres with a small grist mill on the falls of the Vermillion River. It was on this property that William and Mary decided to build their dream home.

They chose a Gothic Revival home featured in Andrew Jackson Downing’s 1852 book Cottage Residences.  Downing was a pioneer in American landscape architect and author, whose reputation as a horticulturist was widespread.  He inspired Americans to surround their homes with the beauty of nature and encouraged the use of good design even in planning farmsteads.  More mansion than a cottage, the house has ten fireplaces; its limestone walls are three feet thick and, except for the cherry staircase rail, all the woodwork is made from white pine finished at the site. William and Mary chose three Downing designs for their rural home site; their residence, Carriage Barn, and Ice House. The estate is a complete example of the Gothic Revival style of Andrew Jackson Downing.

Carroll Simmons, a friend of the LeDuc grandchildren, purchased the home in 1940 for his antique business. In 1958 he donated the home and outbuildings with 4 acres to the Minnesota Historical Society (MHS), with the agreement that he would continue using it for his antique business until he retired, which wasn’t until 1986. Between 1986 and 2003 the future of the property was uncertain.  Although it was the first property acquired by MHS, they had opened other house museums by the time they took possession.  Needed repairs were done on the house and carriage barn, but the property stood empty.

Citizen groups actively sought out ways to fulfill Carroll Simmons’ vision of having the LeDuc house open to the public.  In 2002 the Minnesota Legislature apportioned 1.2 million dollars in bonding funds for MHS to preserve the house and bring it up to current building codes.  Agreements were executed between the Minnesota Historical Society, the City of Hastings and the Dakota County Historical Society, which resulted in city ownership and DCHS management of the site.

The site opened for tours on May 22, 2005.  June 24, 2005, the Minnesota Historical Society deaccessioned the LeDuc House to the City of Hastings. As part of the agreement, the Society transferred $604,000 of net assets provided by Carroll Simmons for endowment, repairs, and maintenance of the LeDuc House.

 

 

 

Sources:

Original Record (Civil War) I Vol. 52, Part I, pg. 663.

An American Gothic: The Life & Times & Legacy of William Gates LeDuc, Steve Werle, Dakota County Historical Society, 2004

This Business of War; Recollections of a Civil War Quartermaster, William G. LeDuc, Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1963

Hastings Star Gazette, 3-20-2003

Minnesota Historical Society Annual Report, 2005

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Lawshe Memorial Museum

Lawshe Memorial Museum was created to protect, understand and share the history of the community, the Dakota County Historical Society was created in 1939.  They did not have a museum until 1955, and even then it was small, housed in a single room within the local high school. However, throughout the years, the museum and the artifacts it contained grew larger. They eventually broke ground for a permanent museum building, created for the bicentennial celebration, on December 30, 1976. (Lawshe Memorial Museum)

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Theurer-Wrigley Mansion

The Theurer-Wrigley House, or “Wrigley Mansion”, is located in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. This gargantuan 13,000 square foot home was built in 1896 and is a wonderful example of Chicago’s architectural history with its Italian Rennaissance & Craftsman qualities. As its name suggests, the home was originally built for Schoenhofen Brewing Company owner Joseph Theurer, but was later owned by Chicago’s well-known Wrigley family. The expansive interior has been well preserved and the beautiful woodwork and ornate details can be seen throughout. With nine bedrooms, a grand ballroom, and a carriage house, this historic property is a must-see! (Matterport)

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Lincoln Heritage Museum

Abraham Lincoln is perhaps one of the most universally renowned and admired individuals in all of world history. His name is familiar in all corners of the globe. Visitors from all over the world come to the United States to learn more about who Abraham Lincoln was, as in many ways Lincoln is who America is. Our Lincoln Heritage Museum has been such a destination, as we witness visitors from nearly every state and many countries annually.

The Lincoln Heritage Museum allows visitors to appreciate the incredible life and legacy of Abraham Lincoln. As Lincoln famously said in his Gettysburg Address, “It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.” So it is for us to carry the lessons of Abraham Lincoln and his times to new generations. With that in mind, our mission is to interpret for the public the life and legacy of Abraham Lincoln and the world in which he lived—particularly as it pertained to Illinois—and to be an academic resource for students from elementary school through adulthood. We invite all to learn from Lincoln and live like Lincoln. (Lincoln Heritage Museum)

Captured by: Lincoln College

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Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress

“Flying Fortress” because of its many machine gun mounts. Only a few of these historic aircrafts survive today. In this model, you can explore the entire body of the plane, including the cockpit, bombardier’s seat, radio room, and the fuselage.This particular aircraft was restored to wartime configuration by The Collings Foundation. It is named “Nine-O-Nine” in honor of a 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron plane of the same name which completed 140 missions without an abort or loss of a single crewman. Today, she flies as part of the Wings of Freedom tour. The Collings Foundation organizes living history events to help Americans learn more about their heritage through direct participation. (Matterport)

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Boeing B-29 Superfortress

The Boeing B-29 Superfortress is a heavy bomber used primarily by the United State in both World War II and the Korean War. This particular plane, known as T-Square 54, flew 37 bombing missions with the 87th Bomb Squadron, 498th Bomb Group in World War II and was converted to an aerial refueling tanker for the Korean War. Today, this Boeing B-29 can be found in the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington. (Matterport)

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Living Homeless

There are about 7,000 people living homeless in San Francisco, of whom about 3,000 live on the streets. Walk along 13th street, where many people were living in January 2016, to experience first-hand one of their neighborhoods. One of the people living here, Victor, gave us a tour of his tent and shared his story with us. We created these models to help bring new attention to this issue in San Francisco by letting people experience this location as if they were there. Thank you to Bill Robinson of Capture It 3D, who created this model. View stories about these models from ZDnet and 3D Printing Industry(Matterport)

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The September 11 Memorial Walkway of Southern Illinois

The September 11 Memorial Walkway of Southern Illinois will be dedicated to the many victims and brave respondents of the vicious attacks on America’s freedom and ideals. The Memorial will honor victims of the attacks and those who risked their lives to save others. It will recognize the thousands who survived and the remarkable compassion displayed in the aftermath.

The walkway will be located in the Belleville, IL at the Fire Department Administration Office at Illinois Route 15 and Illinois Route 159. The walkway will feature a 7,100-pound steel remnant of the World Trade Center as the centerpiece and chronicle the story of the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and Flight 93 on that fateful day. (World Trade Center Memorial Walkway
of Southern Illinois)

Captured by: InvelopNow

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Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Formerly placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now renamed Independence Hall), the bell today is located in the Liberty Bell Center in Independence National Historical Park. The bell was commissioned in 1752 by the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly from the London firm of Lester and Pack (known subsequently as the Whitechapel Bell Foundry), and was cast with the lettering “Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof,” a Biblical reference from the Book of Leviticus (25:10). The bell first cracked when rung after its arrival in Philadelphia, and was twice recast by local workmen John Pass and John Stow, whose last names appear on the bell. In its early years, the bell was used to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to alert citizens about public meetings and proclamations.

Although no immediate announcement was made of the Second Continental Congress’s vote for independence, and so the bell could not have rung on July 4, 1776, related to that vote, bells were rung on July 8 to mark the reading of the Declaration of Independence. While there is no contemporary account of the Liberty Bell ringing, most historians believe it was one of the bells rung. After American independence was secured, the bell fell into relative obscurity until, in the 1830s, the bell was adopted as a symbol by abolitionist societies, who dubbed it the “Liberty Bell.”

The bell acquired its distinctive large crack sometime in the early 19th century—a widespread story claims it cracked while ringing after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835. The bell became famous after an 1847 short story claimed that an aged bell-ringer rang it on July 4, 1776, upon hearing of the Second Continental Congress’s vote for independence. Despite the fact that the bell did not ring for independence on that July 4, the tale was widely accepted as fact, even by some historians. Beginning in 1885, the City of Philadelphia, which owns the bell, allowed it to go to various expositions and patriotic gatherings. The bell attracted huge crowds wherever it went, additional cracking occurred and pieces were chipped away by souvenir hunters. The last such journey occurred in 1915, after which the city refused further requests.

After World War II, the city allowed the National Park Service to take custody of the bell while retaining ownership. The bell was used as a symbol of freedom during the Cold War and was a popular site for protests in the 1960s. It was moved from its longtime home in Independence Hall to a nearby glass pavilion on Independence Mall in 1976, and then to the larger Liberty Bell Center adjacent to the pavilion in 2003. The bell has been featured on coins and stamps, and its name and image have been widely used by corporations. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: Take the Tour Now

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Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rock is the traditional site of disembarkation of William Bradford and the Mayflower Pilgrims who founded Plymouth Colony in 1620. The Pilgrims did not refer to Plymouth Rock in any of their writings; the first known recorded reference to the rock dates to 1715 when it was described in the town boundary records as “a great rock.” The first documented claim that Plymouth Rock was the landing place of the Pilgrims was made by Elder Thomas Faunce in 1741, 121 years after the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth. From that time to the present, Plymouth Rock has occupied a prominent spot in American tradition and has been interpreted by later generations as a symbol both of the virtues and flaws of the first English people who colonized New England. In 1774, the rock broke in half during an attempt to haul it to Town Square in Plymouth. The top portion (the fragment now visible) sat in Town Square, was moved to Pilgrim Hall Museum in 1834, and was returned to its original site on the shore of Plymouth Harbor in 1880. Today it is ensconced beneath a granite canopy designed by McKim, Mead & White. (Wikipedia)

Captured by: AerialOptics

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“Air Force One” Boeing VC-137B

The Flying Oval Office

The first presidential jet plane, a specially built Boeing 707-120, is known as SAM (Special Air Missions) 970. This aircraft, as well as any other Air Force aircraft, carried the call sign “Air Force One” when the president was aboard. Delivered in 1959 to replace Eisenhower’s Super-Constellation, the high-speed jet transport is a flying Oval Office with a modified interior and sophisticated communication equipment.

Jet technology gave a president the opportunity to meet face-to-face with world leaders easily. SAM 970 has carried presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon as well as VIPs such as Nikita Khrushchev and Henry Kissinger.

By 1962, SAM 970 was replaced by a newer Boeing VC-137C. But SAM 970 remained in the presidential fleet ferrying VIPs and the Vice-President until June of 1996.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Museum of Flight)

https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/boeing-air-force-one-vc-25-62cc03c08f9441209d0f71fcaaf0d87b

NASA Shuttle Fuselage Trainer

Captured by: Tosolini Productions

The FFT is a full-scale mockup of the space shuttle orbiter — without the wings. It was used as a testbed for upgrades to the shuttle fleet and for astronaut training such as extra-vehicular activity (EVA) and emergency egress. Built at Johnson Space Center in the 1970s, it was the oldest mockup in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF). The FFT includes flight-quality systems, such as a payload bay, lighting and closed circuit TV (CCTV).

The Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF) was located inside Building 9 of Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. It housed several space shuttle mockups, including the FFT, as well as mockups of every major pressurized module on the International Space Station. It was primarily used for astronaut training and systems familiarization.

It typically took at least a year and sometimes longer for astronauts to train, depending on the objectives of the mission. Each crew spent up to 100 hours training in the SVMF in more than 20 separate classes.

While many of the systems in the SVMF are flight-like, they do not contain what is generally known as simulators (as used to train pilots). Instead, the FFT and other trainers in the SVMF were used for astronaut training in housekeeping, in-flight maintenance, stowage familiarity, ingress/egress, etc.

It took a versatile team comprising a variety of skills and experience to develop, maintain and operate the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility. Specialists such as designers, engineers, project managers, electronic technicians and shop technicians were used to create the accurate mockups to train astronauts, test systems, and procedures, and serve as gravity-bound simulations. (Museum of Flight)

Wampanoag Homesite Wetu

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Pilgrim Villager House

Created by: Aerial Optics

Plimoth Plantation, founded in 1947, is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA that attempts to replicate the original settlement of the Plymouth Colony established in the 17th century by English colonists who later became known as the Pilgrims. They were among the first people who emigrated to America to seek religious separation from the Church of England. It is a not-for-profit museum supported by Administrations, contributions, grants, and volunteers.

The re-creations are based upon a wide variety of first-hand and second-hand records, accounts, articles, and period paintings and artifacts, and the museum conducts ongoing research and scholarship, including historical archaeological excavation and curation locally and abroad.

In the 1624 English Village section of the museum, first-person interpreters have been trained to speak, act, and dress appropriately for the period, whereas third-person (or modern) interpreters have been trained to answer inquiries that guests may have which those in character are unable to answer while in their respective roles. At Plimoth Plantation, they are called historical interpreters, and they interact with their “strange visitors” (i.e., the modern general public) in the first person, answering questions, discussing their lives and viewpoints, and participating in tasks such as cooking, planting, blacksmithing, and animal husbandry. The 1624 English Village loosely follows a timeline, chronologically representing the calendar year 1624 from late March through November (the months when the museum is open), depicting day-to-day life and seasonal activities, as well as featuring some key historical events, such as funerals and special celebrations. (Wikipedia)

Helen Keller’s Birthplace

Captured by: Scott & Kristal Riddle

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deaf-blind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree. The story of how Keller’s teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Her birthplace in West Tuscumbia, Alabama, is now a museum and sponsors an annual “Helen Keller Day”. Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, the 100th anniversary of her birth.

A prolific author, Keller was well-traveled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women’s suffrage, labor rights, socialism, anti-militarism, and other similar causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame in 1971 and was one of twelve inaugural inductees to the Alabama Writers Hall of Fame on June 8, 2015. Keller proved to the world that deaf people could all learn to communicate and that they could survive in the hearing world. She also taught that deaf people are capable of doing things that hearing people can do. One of the most famous deaf people in history, she is an idol to many deaf people in the world. (Wikipedia)